Young Sandwich terns with rings seen again


This video from the Netherlands is called Sandwich Tern chick preening. There are also some black-headed gulls in the video.

Ecomare museum on Texel island in the Netherlands reports today about Sandwich terns on the island.

This year, 7600 Sandwich tern couples nested in Utopia nature reserve, near the Wadden Sea.

88 chicks in these nests were ringed this year. 35 of those young terns were seen again later. Two of them in France, one in England.

Most chicks were seen again in Utopia. 11 had flown away further. Six went to the Slufter on Texel. One to the Maasvlakte near Rotterdam. Two to De Putten nature reserve in Noord-Holland province. These two De Putten youngsters continued to France (Le Havre region).

Unfortunately, one chick (the smallest one of all) was found dead.

Hunch-backed dolphins off Bahrain


This video is called Chinese White Dolphin (Sousa chinensis chinensis).

In Bahrain, there is not only ugly torture and beautiful birds, but also beautiful dolphins.

From the Bahrain News Agency:

Hunch-backed dolphins sighted in territorial waters

01:52 PM – 31/08/2014

Manama, Aug. 31: The rare species of hunch-backed dolphins (sousa chinesis)

Sic: Sousa chinensis. In scientific names, the first, genus, name always begins with a capital. While the second, species, name does not. Many people make mistakes in this.

have recently been sighted off Sitra Island.

A female dolphin accompanied by a swarm of dolphins was seen attempting to resuscitate her dying youngster who eventually succumbed. Regional experts were consulted to verify the specifies

Sic: species

. According to a previous study conducted in 2006, there were 227 dolphins in Bahrain’s territorial waters during the study period which prefer to inhabit shallow island waters.

The Supreme Council of the Environment (SCE) urged fishermen, seafarers and captains of commercial vessels to take care upon sighting this rare species and other wildlife in order to ensure their safety and contribution in natural habitats and the boom and flourishing of the Kingdom of Bahrain’s maritime ecology. This rare species of dolphins is also known as the White Chinese Dolphin measuring 3.5 meters, weighing 250 kg. It had been sighted for the first time in Hong Kong waters in the fifteenth century. It is now listed as one of the endangered species.

The SCE urged the public to cooperate and to call the Hotline: 80001112 in order to report any damage to the environment which harms wildlife and fauna of all sorts.

The SCE has urged fishermen to comply with national regulations and to avoid incurring damage to marine mammals, dolphins and turtles.

New sea spider discovery in the Netherlands


This video is called Creatures of the Deep: Sea Spider.

Translated from the Dutch marine biologists of Stichting ANEMOON:

Another marine animal can be added to the Dutch fauna list: a sea spider with the scientific name Endeis spinosa. It is a species that is common in many places of the Northwest European coast, and in the past it was found several times washed up on Dutch beaches. In August 2014, this sea spider was first found alive by recreational divers on the bottom of the Oosterschelde estuary. This finally proved that the species is present here as a native, and has earned a place on our marine fauna list.

Good kingfisher news from the Netherlands


This video from Ireland is called Kingfisher | The Secret Life of the Shannon.

This morning, Dutch kingfisher researcher Jelle Harder reported on the radio that this year, there are 39 kingfisher nests in the Gooi and Vecht river region. Last year, there were only 11 nests. The mild winter this year was favourable for the survival of kingfishers.

Tern migration in England


This video is called Arctic Tern Migration Google Earth Tour Video.

Spurn Bird Observatory in England writes in a Twitter message about today :

Best tern roost movement this year, 1 Roseate [tern], 2 Black [tern], 24 Sarnie [Sandwich tern], 6 Arctic [tern], 10,360 Common Tern south.

Good Guatemalan birds and amphibians news update


This video says about itself:

A singing male Pink-headed Warbler, Ergaticus (formerly Cardellina) versicolor, at the roadside edge of a large forest patch on the Ocosingo Highway in Chiapas, Mexico, on March 21, 2014.

From Wildlife Extra:

An important lagoon and montane forest property in Guatemala is purchased by conservation charity

Thanks to a donation from Puro Coffee the World Land Trust has the funds to help their partner Fundación Para el Ecodesarrollo y la Conservación (FUNDAECO) purchase Laguna Brava in western Guatemala.

The property measures 1,186 acres (480 hectares), with the lake (Yolnabaj) takes up just under half the area of the property. The remainder is made up of some of the last remnants of the region’s montane tropical karst forest on the northern, southern and eastern side of the lake.

It supports many rare species including amphibians and birds and is home to three species of tree frog that are listed as Critically Endangered by IUCN, as well Lincoln’s Climbing Salamander, which is registered as Near Threatened.

The forest surrounding the lagoon hosts 72 different bird species including the Highlands Guan (Penelopina nigra), and the Pink-headed Warbler (Ergaticus versicolor), both registered by IUCN as Vulnerable.

“FUNDAECO’s determination to create this reserve, which forms the first protected reserve in the region, will help many previously unprotected but Critically Endangered species,” said Charlotte Beckham, WLT’s Conservation Programmes Co-ordinator.

Read all about the conservation charity World Land Trust and the work it does HERE.

Grizzly bear orphan returns to the wild in Canada


This video says about itself:

Grizzly Bear Encounters

Of all the species I have filmed in the wild I have to admit nothing can quite compare to the Grizzly! They are a powerful and majestic mammal that in one glance takes us back to the time of the last ice age when mega fauna roamed the earth. Like all bears, they are a curious and intelligent species. This footage was taken during the spring and these bears were busy looking for food after a long winter.

Close Grizzly bear encounters happen usually when people roam into the territory of the bear and as you’ll see in this film, sometimes people tend to get much closer then they should.

All grizzlies are technically called “Brown Bears” and they are omnivores like their Black Bear cousins. Unlike the Black Bear, a Grizzly female will protect her young very aggressively instead of sitting by while the cubs climb a tree as a Black bear would. In fact they will even stand up to a larger male grizzly if that’s what it takes to protect her cubs. If you ever do run across the cubs in the wild keep your distance, mama bear is sure to be close by and she wont appreciate the company. Please remember that these beautiful bears need clean and healthy habitat to continue to allow us to have amazing Grizzly Bear Encounters!

I’m Mark Fraser and to read up on future wildlife adventures and how you can protect help wildlife habitat, visit my web page.

From Wildlife Extra:

Grizzly orphan returns to the wild in British Columbia

A one-year-old orphan grizzly cub, called Littlefoot, has been released back into the wild near Cranbrook in British Columbia, after being found in the spring severely underweight. It is believed he was orphaned last autumn.

During this time he has been cared for by the Northern Lights Wildlife Society (NLWS) and gone from a scrawny 12.7kg to a far more respectable 48kg.

Lightfoot is part of a project, run by International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), the Northern Lights Wildlife Society, and the British Columbia Ministries of Environment, and Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, that monitors whether orphaned grizzlies can survive when released back in the wild.

Lightfoot is the sixth release since the pilot project began in 2008, and is the first one-year-old that NLWS has prepared for release. He has been fitted with a satellite collar and will be monitored for the next 18 months.

“When he came in, Littlefoot was older than most of the bears we receive for care,” said Angelika Langen of NLWS. “Because he had lost his mother last fall and hibernated by himself, he was in bad condition.

“Thankfully, the Ministry of the Environment allowed this bear into our care for a limited time period to give him a chance to gain weight so he could look after himself.

“We’ve picked a great release site for him away from people with a good berry crop out there, and I think he has a good chance of survival.”

“We were thrilled to see the approval for a yearling cub to enter the rehabilitation process,” said Kelly Donithan, Animal Rescue Officer at IFAW. “Our wildlife rescue and rehabilitation pilot projects around the world have been providing evidence that animals can be rehabilitated from a young age and, upon release, not only survive but thrive in their natural habitat.

“We are excited to see how Littlefoot navigates his new lease on life and becomes a fully functioning wild bear.”