Great Barrier Reef let down by Australian government


This video is called BBC Great Barrier Reef II 2012 HD.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Campaigners dismiss inadequate Australian Great Barrier Reef protection plan

Tuesday 16th September 2014

Environmental activists lashed out at a new Australian government plan purporting to protect the Great Barrier Reef yesterday.

The plan had been released to allay UN concerns but the activists said that it was inadequate to halt the reef’s decline.

Environment Minister Greg Hunt claimed that the draft “Reef 2050 Long-Term Sustainability Plan” was an effort to balance important priorities.

“Maintaining and protecting this iconic World Heritage area, while considering the needs for long-term sustainable development, is a critical priority,” Mr Hunt alleged.

But WWF Australia head Dermot O’Gorman said the draft did not set high enough targets for cutting agricultural pollution or provide “the billions of dollars required to restore the health of the reef.”

“At this stage, Reef 2050 lacks the bold new actions needed in order to halt the reef’s decline,” Mr O’Gorman said.

The draft plan bans future port development in the Fitzroy Delta, Keppel Bay and North Curtis Island near Rockhampton in Queensland state — areas of the reef described by environmentalists as key incubators of marine life — but it exempts priority port development areas from the ban.

Australian Marine Conservation Society spokeswoman Felicity Wishart said it should have recommended laws to minimise dredging as well as ban dumping in reef waters.

“From our point of view the reef is in dire straits,” she said, adding that the plan should have been a “lifeline” to turn the reef around over the next 35 years.

Wild boar smell truffles, not acorns


This is a wild boar video, recorded in winter in Sweden.

Translated from Roelof Kleis in the Netherlands:

Tuesday, September 16th, 2014

Wild boar have a good nose for truffles. But not for acorns, says PhD student Lennart Suselbeek of Wageningen University. Looking for acorns they search randomly, according to research into how wild boar search for hidden acorns.

Suselbeek comes to that conclusion based on experiments in the lab and in nature. The aim of the study was to determine whether wild boar have influence on the way that wood mice hide acorns. Wild boars, like mice, love acorns. So they are competitors. But when it comes to defending its stock, the mouse is no match for the boar. It must be smart. They cannot be smart by hiding everything at the same place, but by making many different small stock sheds. So, risk spreading.

Dutch butterflies have a good September


This French video is about male and female speckled wood butterflies.

The Dutch Butterfly foundation reports about butterflies in the Netherlands, so far this September.

Usually, in September butterfly numbers go down.

However, so far this month, the numbers go up.

Especially speckled wood butterflies contribute to this rise, being much more numerous than in previous years.

Also, map butterflies.

Stop vulture poisoning


This video says about itself:

Stop Vulture Poisoning Now

12 September 2014

A drug which has poisoned 99% of all vultures in India, Pakistan and Nepal almost overnight, is now spreading rapidly across Europe. This introduction is compounding many other threats to now make vultures one of the most highly-threatened bird families on the planet.

With a united Partnership of 70 conservation organisations across Europe and Africa, BirdLife has the network, knowledge and know-how to save vultures.

They know that simple and effective solutions exist, and urgently need £20,000 to identify, and tackle the threats to these most beautiful and important of birds. Please support BirdLife’s work to stop vulture poisoning now.

Your generous donation will first be used to fight for a ban of veterinary diclofenac across Europe and tackle other threats in Africa. This action alone could save thousands of vultures.

Your money will also enable an expert team of BirdLife scientists to undertake an urgent review of all vulture species. This study will provide vital information enabling thousands of conservationists around the globe to take action. It will empower them to act, and gain greater support for their herculean efforts.

Tackling widespread threats to entire families of birds like this are very difficult, but BirdLife’s experience shows coordinated action can be highly successful. As a result of their experience and expertise with Asian vultures, BirdLife has a small but important head-start in Africa and Europe.

Your support is vital to this work, and will make a real difference to its success. Please, dig deep, donate now and help us keep vultures flying as high as they should be.

Thank you

www.birdlife.org

Music: Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Vulture video footage: Carles Carboneras
Thanks to interviewees: Dr Mark Anderson, Iván Ramírez, Stephen Awoyemi.
Thanks to Margaret Atwood, David Lindo, Simon King, Chris Packham for their support to the campaign.
Photo credits to follow

This video is called Ban diclofenac to save Vultures!

Slow worm video


This is a video about a slow worm, in Balloërveld nature reserve in Drenthe province in the Netherlands.

Ben Ferwerda made the video.

Baby rabbits, video


This is a video about a rabbit warren on a camping ground in the Netherlands.

The young rabbits drink, and their mother stimulates them to come out of the warren.

Dick van der Garde made the video.