Save English tawny owls from speeding cars


This video is called An Introduction to the Tawny Owl (Strix aluco).

From Wildlife Extra:

Tawny owls casualties of speeding cars

East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) is warning drivers in East Sussex to slow down when driving at night following a spate of collisions with tawny owls.

A total of ten tawny owls were hit over a six-week period at Ashdown Forest, Uckfield, Scaynes Hill, Magham Down, Hastings, Lewes, Polegate, and Eastbourne.

“Unfortunately three died out on site before our emergency ambulances arrived,” said WRAS Casualty Centre Manager and Director Kathy Martyn, “three had to be put down due to the severity of their injuries, two have been released and two are still in care.”

The incidents all happened at night or at dusk, when the owls are active, hunting on the roads for rodents in grass verges and roadside embankments. “Many people think it’s safe to drive fast at night as you can see approaching car’s head lights from a distance,” said Trevor Weeks, MBE founder of East Sussex WRAS, “sadly wildlife don’t have lights on them and could easily run out into the road causing potentially fatal injuries to both the animal as well as humans.”

WRAS is seeking to reduce the number of casualties by urging drivers to think about animals that could be crossing roads when driving in the dark.

Tawny owls are common and found throughout the UK, but they remain protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act. Once mated, males and females often stay together for life, and will seldom leave their territory.

More on this is here.

Antarctic colossal squid examined in New Zealand


This video from New Zealand says about itself:

Scientists latch on to colossal squid

Huge specimen caught in Antarctic waters by New Zealand fishing crew is one of few ever examined

16 September 2014

The live stream begins at 06:57: here.

Te Papa has a new colossal squid!

Watch live online as specialists in squid biology from Te Papa and Auckland University of Technology undertake research on this rare find. This colossal squid and the specimen already on display at Te Papa are the only two of their kind caught intact – ever! Large colossal squid specimens in good condition are rarely available to scientists, so this latest example has caused great excitement.

Ask our squid scientists:

Email sciencelive@tepapa.govt.nz with your questions for our squid scientists, or add them in the comments area below. We’ll answer them during the live show.

For regular updates and the latest on the colossal squid, follow:

Colossal squid blogs: www.blog.tepapa.govt.nz/category/colossa­l-squid

See also here.

Firefighters save wild boar piglets from drowning, then gamekeeper kills them


This is a video from Limburg province in the Netherlands, about wild boar piglets which had landed in a canal.

Firefighters then saved them from drowning.

However, as soon as the animals were back on dry land, a gamekeeper killed them.

Limburg province authorities admit the gamekeeper acted illegally.

People in Limburg have started an Internet petition, demanding that the gamekeeper’s licence to hunt is canceled.

The petition (in English) is here.

Birds counted on Vlieland island


This video says about itself:

15 October 2012

The first Caspian Stonechat for the Netherlands was discovered one week ago on Vlieland. It is a subspecies of the Siberian Stonechat, but is a candidate for reaching full species status. Whatever the status, it is a distinct and beautiful bird. The bird was in no rush to leave. We decided to give it a try and booked a ferry trip to Vlieland before continuing our birding weekend on Texel. Despite rainy conditions, we had perfect views of this nice bird. Especially the display of the raised and fully spread tail was a great sight.

Warden Carl Zuhorn on Vlieland island in the Netherlands reports on counting birds on 13 September 2014.

There were then almost 280,000 birds on Vlieland.

Including 98,000 dunlin, 76,000 bar-tailed godwit, and 24,000 red knot.

Other observations:

Two red-footed falcons, two ospreys, one red-necked phalarope, two little egrets and all over the island hundreds of northern wheatears.

North Sea coral discovery


This video from Britain says about itself:

26 May 2014

Join us on a simulated journey through the undersea landscapes of the south west of England from Ilfracombe to delicate pink sea fans in Lyme Bay via Chesil Beach and Berry Head. Common cuttlefish, hermit crab, bootlace seaweed and long snouted sea horse can be found here. Watch plaice send a hermit crab packing before approaching The Lizard’s thick carpets of jewel anenomes, dead man’s fingers and Devonshire cup coral. As we reach the Atlantic we come across sun fish, lion’s mane jellyfish, basking sharks and bottle-nosed dolphins before surfacing at Ilfracombe in Devon. Grey seals swim along corkwing wrasse, ballan wrasse and swimming crabs all searching for food amongst sponges.

Translated from Ecomare museum on Texel island in the Netherlands, 16 September 2014:

During a 10-day diving expedition in the North Sea there were a number of discoveries in ancient sunken ships. The rare polychaete worm Sabellaria [spinulosa] was found for example. But the most remarkable find was a piece of Devonshire cup-coral. Although this species lives occasionally near the English east coast, it was the first time that hard coral was found in the middle of the North Sea.

Parrot toadstool, Dutch Mushroom of the Year


Parrot toadstool

Translated from the Dutch Mycological Society:

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

The parrot toadstool has been elected Mushroom of the Year 2014, this choice is not fortuitous. The parrot toadstool is characteristic of arid grasslands where the soil has not been disturbed for a long time. Where it occurs there are often also other special grassland fungi. It is also one of the most easily recognizable waxcaps. Help the mycologists and go looking for the parrot toadstool.

Good wall lizard news


This video is about counting wall lizards along the railroad to Lanaken in Belgium, near Maastricht in Limburg province in the Netherlands.

Translated from the Dutch RAVON herpetologists:

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

During the renovation of a railway line in Maastricht in 2008 the wall lizard was taken into account. For those lizards, very rare in the Netherlands then there more than 20 drystone walls were built. Since then, the population is closely monitored annually by RAVON. This monitoring showed until recently that there was a slow recovery. However, the reproductive success was lower than people hoped. But the counts of this late summer bring good news. This year, more newborn wall lizards are crawling around than ever before!

Protecting vulnerable populations

The wall lizard lives in the Netherlands originally only in Maastricht. Here live a few hundred to under a thousand animals. That may seem like a lot, but on the northern edge of its range, in an isolated habitat this species in our country is very vulnerable.