Fukushima disaster news


This video is called Nuclear Snow! USS Ronald Reagan Sailors Sue TEPCO Over Fukushima Radiation Sickness.

Fukushima: 20,000 tons of radioactive liquid in the drain system: here.

Tepco corrects last summer’s water pollution data to record high — JIJI Press News: here.

See also here.

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Fukushima disaster and fish


This video is called Radioactive Fish, Pacific Ocean, Fukushima Leaking MORE Radiation update 7/11/13.

By Dr. David Suzuki, EcoWatch:

Filling in the gaps on Fukushima radiation and its effects on fish

January 29, 2014

An Internet search turns up an astounding number of pages about radiation from Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant meltdown that followed an earthquake and tsunami in March 2011. But it’s difficult to find credible information.

One reason is that government monitoring of radiation and its effects on fish stocks appears to be limited. According to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, “No U.S. government or international agency is monitoring the spread of low levels of radiation from Fukushima along the West Coast of North America and around the Hawaiian Islands.”

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s most recent food testing, which includes seafood, appears to be from June 2012. Its website states, “FDA has no evidence that radionuclides from the Fukushima incident are present in the U.S. food supply at levels that would pose a public health concern. This is true for both FDA-regulated food products imported from Japan and U.S. domestic food products, including seafood caught off the coast of the United States.”

The non-profit Canadian Highly Migratory Species Foundation has been monitoring Pacific troll-caught albacore tuna off the B.C. coast. Its 2013 sampling found “no residues detected at the lowest detection limits achievable.” The B.C. Centre for Disease Control website assures us we have little cause for concern about radiation from Japan in our food and environment. Websites for Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency yield scant information.

But the disaster isn’t over. Despite the Japanese government’s claim that everything is under control, concerns have been raised about the delicate process of removing more than 1,500 nuclear fuel rod sets, each containing 60 to 80 fuel rods with a total of about 400 tonnes of uranium, from Reactor 4 to a safer location, which is expected to take a year. Some, including me, have speculated another major earthquake could spark a new disaster. And Reactors 1, 2 and 3 still have tonnes of molten radioactive fuel that must be cooled with a constant flow of water.

A radioactive plume is expected to reach the West Coast sometime this year, but experts say it will be diluted by currents off Japan’s east coast and, according to the Live Science website, “the majority of the cesium-137 will remain in the North Pacific gyre—a region of ocean that circulates slowly clockwise and has trapped debris in its center to form the ‘Great Pacific Garbage Patch’—and continue to be diluted for approximately a decade following the initial Fukushima release in 2011.”

With the lack of data from government, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is asking the public for help. In January, Ken Buesseler, senior scientist and director of the Center for Marine and Environmental Radioactivity at the U.S.-based non-profit, launched a fundraising campaign and citizen science website to collect and analyze seawater along North America’s West Coast.

“Whether you agree with predictions that levels of radiation along the Pacific Coast of North America will be too low to be of human health concern or to impact fisheries and marine life, we can all agree that radiation should be monitored, and we are asking for your help to make that happen,” Buesseler said in a news release.

Participants can help fund and propose new sites for seawater sampling, and collect seawater to ship to the lab for analysis. The David Suzuki Foundation is the point group for two sampling sites, on Haida Gwaii and at Bamfield on the west coast of Vancouver Island. Data will be published at How Radioactive Is Our Ocean?, and will include an evolving map showing cesium concentrations with links to information about radioactivity in the ocean and what the levels mean.

The oceans contain naturally occurring radioactive isotopes and radiation from 1960s nuclear testing. Buesseler doesn’t think levels in the ocean or seafood will become dangerously high because of the Fukushima disaster, but he stresses the importance of monitoring.

The Fukushima disaster was a wake-up call for the potential dangers of nuclear power plants, especially in unstable areas. North Americans may have little cause for concern for now, but without good scientific information to determine whether or not it is affecting our food and environment we can’t know for sure. The Woods Hole initiative is a good start.

50 reasons we should fear the worst from Fukushima — Harvey Wasserman via EcoWatch: here.

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Gays caused British flood disasters, politician says


This video is called UK Storms 2014: Flooding Across England.

There are not only funny theories in Texas, USA about the causes of the first world war. There are also funny theories in England about the causes of recent flood disasters.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

Ukip suspends councillor who claimed floods were caused by gay marriage

Ukip councillor David Silvester’s suspension comes after new interview in which he says gay people ‘can be healed’

Patrick Wintour

Sunday 19 January 2014 15.32 GMT

A Ukip councillor who blamed the Christmas and new year floods on the passage of gay marriage laws has been suspended from the party, Ukip said on Sunday, reversing an earlier view that he was entitled to his opinion.

Henley-on-Thames councillor David Silvester, who defected from the Tories in protest at David Cameron‘s support for same-sex unions, said he had warned the prime minister of “repercussions” if gay marriage went ahead.

He was suspended by Ukip after defying a request not to do further interviews on his beliefs following his initial claims made in a letter to a local newspaper. The move came as leader Nigel Farage launched a clearout of “extremist, nasty or barmy” views from the party ahead of polls in May.

On Sunday Silvester caused fresh controversy, telling BBC Radio Berkshire that being gay was a “spiritual disease” that can be healed. His remarks led Ukip’s official gay and lesbian group to send Silvester a letter saying he had “rightly attracted derision from people of all political beliefs, and once again painted Ukip in a negative light – an unacceptable act for which you cannot be excused”.

Tory business minister Michael Fallon said the comments showed “there clearly are one or two fruitcakes still around there” – a reference to David Cameron’s previous criticisms of Ukip.

Silvester said the new law, paving the way for the first gay marriages in Britain this spring, was the latest mistake that would anger God – following on from abortion laws, which he likened to the Holocaust.

In the radio interview, which followed his initial claims about the link between flooding and gay marriage in a letter to the Henley Standard, Silvester said: “I don’t have a problem with gay people. “I believe as a Christian I should love gay people and indeed, I do.

“My prayer for them is they will be healed. It is nonsense to say it is homophobic. If you love a person enough to want them to be healed and to have a proper family, that is hardly homophobic. It is a spiritual disease … it’s not what I say, it’s what the Bible says.”

Silvester added: “I am a man who prays every day for every member of the cabinet and for every member of the royal family and when, two years ago, I wrote to the prime minister to warn him there are repercussions for serious breaches of the coronation oath, such as this one has been, when I saw what followed I naturally assumed this was the result of them going against God’s laws.

“This is not new, this happened in the Old Testament – they were warned if they turned against God there would be pestilence, there would be war, there would be disasters.”

The open letter from Ukip’s LGBT group said: “The Met Office have stated ‘the main reason for the mild and wet weather so far is that we have seen a predominance of west and south-west winds, bringing in mild air from the Atlantic – as well as generally unsettled conditions’ – regardless of whether you believe in a God or not, sudden rainfall has not just formulated out of nowhere upon the UK. An Act of God this is not.”

Protesters egg home of UKIP ‘gay marriage caused storms’ councillor: here.

United States Republican politician blames gays for tornadoes, diseases, etc.: here.

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Erin Brockovich on West Virginia water pollution


This video from the USA says about itself:

Erin Brockovich: After Chemical Spill, West Virginians Organizing “Stronger Than I’ve Ever Seen”

14 Jan 2014

http://www.democracynow.orgWest Virginia has begun partially lifting its ban on tap water five days after a chemical spill in the Elk River. More than 300,000 residents have been unable to use their water for drinking, cooking or bathing since Thursday, when the company Freedom Industries leaked up to 7,500 gallons of 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol (Crude MCHM), an agent used in coal extraction, into the water supply. Scores of schools and businesses have been closed, including in the state capital, Charleston.

The ban has been lifted in four zones so far, but is still in effect for a vast majority of residents. Dozens of people have been hospitalized since the spill, with symptoms including nausea, vomiting, dizziness, diarrhea, rashes and reddened skin.

We get reaction from Erin Brockovich, the renowned environmentalist, consumer advocate and legal researcher. While a single mother of three working as a legal assistant, she helped win the biggest class-action lawsuit in American history, holding the California power company Pacific Gas & Electric Company for polluting a city’s water supply. Her story was told in the Oscar-winning film “Erin Brockovich.” Today, Brockovich and her team are investigating the spill in West Virginia. On Monday evening, she held a town hall meeting in Charleston to discuss the spill with local residents. “They’re banding together stronger than I’ve ever seen before,” Brockovich says of West Virginians self-organizing in the spill’s aftermath.

A transcript of this video is here.

West Virginia Spill Exposes Disturbing Lack Of Data About Hazardous Chemicals: here.

While water service is slowly being restored to residents in nine West Virginia counties following last Thursday’s chemical spill outside the capitol city of Charleston, major hardships remain for the more than 300,000 people who have been affected: here.

On Friday, Freedom Industries—the company responsible for the chemical leak, which poisoned the water of 300,000 West Virginians—filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The filing is a blatant attempt by the company to escape legal and financial responsibility for the chemical spill, as it will put on hold the some 25 lawsuits already filed against the company since the leak was discovered on January 9: here.

Problems remain with the water in nine West Virginia counties despite the lifting of the last of the water bans on Saturday. Some 300,000 West Virginians–representing more than 16 percent of the state’s population–were told their tap water was not safe for anything but flushing toilets following a chemical leak into the Elk River in Charleston that made its way in to the main water intake for area residents: here.

West Virginia Governor on whether to drink the water: ‘It’s your decision… I’m not a scientist’: here.

“What we know scares us, and we know there’s a lot more we don’t know.” – scientist on West Virginia water: here.

Freedom Industries—the company responsible for the January 9 chemical spill just outside Charleston, West Virginia—has told state regulators that the leak also contained polyglycol ethers, or PPH: here.

More than 100,000 gallons of coal slurry—a toxic liquid mixture of cleaning chemicals and coal refuse—contaminated about six miles of a stream in Kanawha County, West Virginia on Tuesday. Kanawha County is home to the state’s capital, Charleston, and was the epicenter for last month’s chemical spill which poisoned the water supply for 300,000 residents in nine counties. (See: Chemical spill leaves 300,000 without water in West Virginia): here.

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Fukushima disaster continues


This video says about itself:

Fukushima Daiichi: Why Is It So Hard To Clean-Up?

In this, the fourth installment in our short film series, Fairewinds Energy Education’s Arnie Gundersen responds to questions we have received about cleanup at Fukushima Daiichi.

And this video, about nuclear radiation and the USA, says about itself:

Atomic Sailors

In this, the fifth installment in our short film series, Fairewinds Energy Education’s Arnie Gundersen discusses radiation exposure to our armed forces. Here is a link to the Tampa Bay Times article referenced in the video.

Fukushima ghost towns struggle to recover — The Hindu: here.

‘Duct tape, wire nets’ were used to mend Fukushima water tanks – worker: here.

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