Mexican wolves born in wild for first time in decades


This video from the USA says about itself:

24 April 2013

An account of the Mexican Wolf, or lobo, at Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, NY.

From Associated Press:

Mexico Reports Litter Of Mexican Gray Wolves Born In Wild For First Time In Decades

07/18/2014 12:59 pm EDT

MEXICO CITY — The first known litter of Mexican gray wolves has been born in the wild as part of a three-year effort to re-introduce the subspecies to a habitat where it disappeared three decades ago, Mexican officials reported Thursday.

Mexico’s National Commission for Natural Protected Areas said the wolf pups were sighted in June by a team of researchers in the western Sierra Madre mountains.

“This first litter represents an important step in the recovery program, because these will be individuals that have never had contact with human beings, as wolves bred in captivity inevitably do,” the commission said in a statement.

It said the pups appeared to be doing well.

Mexico began reintroducing wolves in 2011, and the parents of this litter had been released in December with hopes they would reproduce. Authorities seldom reveal the exact location of breeding pairs in recovery programs, to protect endangered species.

The commission did not respond to requests about how many wolves now live in the wild in Mexico.

The Mexican gray wolf was almost wiped out in the U.S. Southwest by the same factors that eliminated it in Mexico: hunting, trapping and poisoning.

The last five survivors in the U.S. were captured between 1977 and 1980, and then bred in captivity. The first wolves were re-introduced into the wild in the Southwest starting in 1998, mainly in Arizona and New Mexico.

The Mexican gray wolf remains an endangered species in the United States and Mexico.

But a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service annual survey released in January showed there are at least 83 of the endangered predators in Arizona and New Mexico, marking the fourth year in a row the population has increased.

Roe deer lives saved by mirrors


This video is about a roe deer in Yorkshire in England.

Translated from daily Tubantia in the Netherlands:

Wildlife mirrors save lives of roe deer

July 21, 09:24

WINTERSWIJK – Putting more wildlife mirrors along the roads in the Achterhoek region has ensured that far fewer roe deer are killed by traffic.

35 deer

Last year “only” 35 deer died. “That’s about 20 percent lower than in other years,” said Jurgen Hejink, secretary of the Wildlife Management Unit (WBE) Winterswijk and surroundings.

Blue reflectors

Blue reflectors are placed by the game management units along several roads in the Achterhoek. Roe deer are scared of light rays of cars that are reflected by the blue reflectors. That keeps them from running on the roads.

Five short-eared owl babies born


This video from Britain is called Separating Short-eared and Long-eared Owls.

Translated from Natuurmonumenten conservation organisation in the Netherlands:

Young short-eared owls born in Skrok

Monday, July 21, 2014 11:11

Unique: Five owlets were born from a nesting pair of short-eared owls in Skrok nature reserve. Unique to the Frisian area, 10km north of Sneek. It is certainly twenty years since breeding short-eared eared owls had been observed there for the last time.

Mowing postponed

Ranger Sander Veenstra: “Now that we know this, we will definitely not mow this plot in the coming weeks.” …

It’s a good short-eared owl year. This year there is a surplus of mice. And that is visible. In the nest of this couple there are mice which have not even been eaten. The parents have made a sort of a pantry. The owlets can use this as well in the coming months. In a few weeks’ time, they will fly off. A unique event for Skrok,” says ranger Sander Veenstra.

Four new rodent species discovered in Bolivia


This video is about tuco-tucos.

From Science, Space & Robots:

Scientists Identify Four New Species of Tuco-Tucos

Scientists have identified four new species of tuco-tuco in Bolivia. The research team was led by Scott Gardner from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Tuco-tucos are gopher-like mammals that make burrows for homes. They range in size as adults from 7 to 12 inches (.2 to .3 meters) and weigh about 1 pound (0.45 kilograms).

The researchers say the high ridges that create deep river valleys in central Bolivia have aided the development of different tuco-tuco species through geographic isolation. The four new tuco-tuco species include Ctenomys erikacuellarae (Erika’s tuco-tuco), Ctenomys andersoni (Anderson’s cujuchi), Ctenomys lessai (Lessa’s tuco-tuco) and Ctenomys yatesi (Yates’ tuco-tuco). There are about 65 tuco-tuco species in South America. Bolivia has twelve of them with the four newly identified species. …

Tuco-tucos dig complex burrows using their claws and their teeth. These burrows feature long branching tunnels and include a main tunnel that is longer than 46 feet (14 meters). They reportedly make a loud “tuc-tuc” noise which is where the tuco-tuco name comes from.

Gardner said in a statement, “The area from which these mammals were collected is still relatively unknown in a biological sense, even though this is the eastern foothills of the Andes, with among the highest level of biodiversity anywhere.”

A research paper on the new species was published here in the Special Publications from the Museum of Text Tech University.

July 21, 2014

Save North Carolina’s red wolves


From eNature.com in the USA:

Save the Red Wolf Sign Our Petition To End Illegal Poaching Of An American Icon! Take action today!

Red wolf

They once roamed the southeastern U.S. Now they’re making a last stand in the forests of eastern North Carolina.

Please sign our petition encouraging measures to protect our few remaining Red Wolves!

Dear Friend,

Red wolves once roamed across the southeastern United States. Today, they are making their last stand in the scrub forests of eastern North Carolina. Just 90-110 wild Red wolves remain in North Carolina – the only place they exist in the wild.

You can help protect our remaining Red Wolves by signing this petition!

Red wolf

Red wolves were once abundant across the Southeast — roaming from Virginia to Florida and all the way to east Texas. By 1970, however, they’d been driven to the brink of extinction by decades of persecution and systematic efforts to eliminate wolves from the American landscape. After the species was declared endangered in 1973, the last 17 wild red wolves were captured for a captive breeding program.

However, there is hope….

Red wolf releases began in North Carolina’s Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in the mid 1980s, but recovery efforts have repeatedly been thwarted by illegal shootings that have kept the population from expanding. And now, rather than taking steps to curtail activities that harm red wolves, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has done little and the poaching continues.

Will you sign our petition urging action to protect our remaining Red wolves from this illegal poaching?

Please urge Fish and Wildlife Service Director Daniel Ashe and other decision-makers to protect our remaining Red wolves and continue the very succesful reintroduction program in the Alligator National Wildlife Refuge.

So please sign this petition. Director Ashe and others need to know we ALL believe that these wolves deserve protection.

Thank you for your help– it really can help make a difference! While it may seem like “inside baseball”, reaching out to Director Ashe as we are with this petition is the BEST way to ensure he knows that we care about Red wolves and their fate in the wild.

Sincerely,

Robin McVey

Robin McVey
Public Editor, eNature.com

Minke whales in the North Sea


This video from Australia is called MEET The MINKE WHALES.

Ecomare museum on Texel island in the Netherlands reports about minke whales, photographed near the Dogger Bank in the North Sea.

Biologists estimate there are about 9,000 minke whales in the North Sea, especially its northern parts.

Red squirrel eats walnut, video


This is a video about a red squirrel feeding on a walnut.

The video is by keliinfo from the Netherlands.