Beetle and fly quarrel on flower, video


This is a video about a spotted longhorn beetle and a common flesh fly quarreling on a goldenrod flower.

Henk Lammers in Hupsel village in the Netherlands made the video.

Rare butterfly invasion in the Netherlands


This 15 July 2014 Dutch entomology video is about the recent invasion in the Netherlands of scarce tortoiseshell butterflies; a species, new for the Netherlands.

See also here.

Butterflies and dragonflies of Rottumerplaat island


This video from Britain is called Grayling Butterflies, Hipparchia semele.

Jasper Zoeter, Martijn Bunskoek and Tim van Nus, wardens of desert island Rottumerplaat in the Netherlands, report about butterflies and dragonflies.

This summer, graylings are the most common butterflies: hundreds were seen.

Other Rottumerplaat butterflies this year: meadow brown; small copper; small heath; comma; Essex skipper; common blue.

About dragonflies, they write:

Not only for birds the water tank below the tower is useful. For dragonflies it is interesting, because between 1 and 11 July here almost daily ruddy darters metamorphosed from larva to adult. Based on the number of counted and collected larva skins at least 48 individuals emerged from the shallow water. Special, they all came from such a small pond! Reproduction of dragonflies on Rottumerplaat is known from only a few species. On 5 and 6 July, a strong southerly winds brought large numbers of dragonflies to the island. This were mainly various types of darters, including the nationally rare yellow-winged darter, of which one female was observed. We have also seen an emperor dragonfly a few times.

New butterfly species discovery in the Netherlands


This video says about itself:

Scarce Tortoiseshell Feeds on Oak Sap ヒオドシチョウがミズナラ樹液を吸汁

9 February 2014

A Scarce Tortoiseshell (aka Yellow-legged Tortoiseshell; Nymphalis xanthomelas japonica, family Nymphalidae) feeding on the fermenting sap of an oak tree (Quercus crispula, family Fagaceae). October 2013 in Japan.

Translated from the Dutch Vlinderstichting entomologists:

July 14, 2014

Invasion of a new butterfly species in the Netherlands: scarce tortoiseshell seen

This week a butterfly species entered our country which had never been seen before in the Netherlands: the scarce tortoiseshell. This involves dozens of individuals. This species was initially unnoticed because it is very similar to another one: the large tortoiseshell. An expert from the Butterfly Foundation discovered that many sightings of large tortoiseshells reported since late last week were incorrect. It was in all cases the scarce tortoiseshell.

Usually, this species, new for the Netherlands, lives much further to the east.

Wasps on Amsterdam balcony, video


This video from the Netherlands says about itself (translated):

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Vincent Bouman on his balcony in Amsterdam-South has four birch bird houses. One of them is now the home of a wasp family.

Rare spider back in the Netherlands after 124 years


This video is about a Piratula knorri spider.

Naturalists in the Netherlands report that a spider species, last seen in the Netherlands in 1890, was seen again on 29 May 2014 in Limburg province.

This species is called Piratula knorri.

Bayer’s neonicotinoids kill birds, new research


This video says about itself:

Bees Dying Off, Colony Collapse

29 aug. 2010

Imagine a world without bees..

Imidacloprid is the most widely used insecticide in the world and Bayer´s best-selling pesticide (2009 sales: €606 million). The substance is often used as seed-dressing, especially for maize, sunflower and rapeseed. The beginning of the marketing of imidacloprid coincided with the occurrence of large bee deaths, first in France, later on also in many other European countries, Canada, the US and Brazil.

After huge bee mortality in Germany in 2008 which was shown to be caused by neonicotinoid pesticides the Coalition against Bayer Dangers accused the Bayer management of downplaying the risks of imidacloprid, submitting deficient studies to authorities and thereby accepting huge losses of honey bees in many parts of the world. At the same time, German authorities imposed a ban on the use of imidacloprid and its successor product, clothianidin, on maize. Italy and Slovenia imposed a similar ban.

In France imidacloprid has been banned as a seed dressing for sunflowers (since 1999) and maize (since 2004). In 2003 the Comité Scientifique et Technique, convened by the French government, declared that the treatment of seeds with imidacloprid leads to “significant risks for bees”. The consumption of contaminated pollen can cause an increased mortality of care-taking-bees. When individual bees were exposed to sublethal doses their foraging activity decreased and they became disorientated, which researchers concluded “can in the course of time damage the entire colony”. Clothianidin was never approved in France.

Music: ‘Through Time and Space’ by Elixirion.

From Nature:

Declines in insectivorous birds are associated with high neonicotinoid concentrations

Caspar A. Hallmann, Ruud P. B. Foppen, Chris A. M. van Turnhout, Hans de Kroon & Eelke Jongejans

09 July 2014

Recent studies have shown that neonicotinoid insecticides have adverse effects on non-target invertebrate species1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Invertebrates constitute a substantial part of the diet of many bird species during the breeding season and are indispensable for raising offspring7.

We investigated the hypothesis that the most widely used neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid,

a Bayer corporation product

has a negative impact on insectivorous bird populations. Here we show that, in the Netherlands, local population trends were significantly more negative in areas with higher surface-water concentrations of imidacloprid. At imidacloprid concentrations of more than 20 nanograms per litre, bird populations tended to decline by 3.5 per cent on average annually.

Additional analyses revealed that this spatial pattern of decline appeared only after the introduction of imidacloprid to the Netherlands, in the mid-1990s. We further show that the recent negative relationship remains after correcting for spatial differences in land-use changes that are known to affect bird populations in farmland. Our results suggest that the impact of neonicotinoids on the natural environment is even more substantial than has recently been reported and is reminiscent of the effects of persistent insecticides in the past. Future legislation should take into account the potential cascading effects of neonicotinoids on ecosystems.

Four-spotted chaser dragonfly video


This video is about a four-spotted chaser dragonfly.

Jan Gorel in the Netherlands made the video.