Black woodpecker video


This is a black woodpecker video.

Renske van de Wiel from the Netherlands made the video.

Don’t kill wigeons, Dutch judge says


This is a video about wigeon males and females in the Netherlands.

Sometimes, Dutch judges make wrong decisions. But sometimes, they make right decisions.

Translated from BirdLife in the Netherlands:

Tuesday, October 21

In Noord-Holland province for the time being wigeons, a duck species, are not allowed to be shot. The court in Haarlem decided last week in an emergency procedure that the exemption which provincial authorities had decided should be suspended. BirdLife in the Netherlands is pleased with the ruling.

Many ring ouzels migrating


This video from Britain says about itself:

BTO Bird ID – Ring Ouzel and Blackbird

13 April 2012

With Ring Ouzel migration about to reach its peak this wonderful thrush can turn up almost anywhere. Check out the latest identification video to help separate this species from Blackbird, both on the ground, in flight and by song.

Translated from the Dutch SOVON ornithologists, 18 October 2014:

The past few days strikingly many ring ouzels were reported at the site trektellen.nl. On 13, 14 and 15 October at bird migration counting sites more than 500 were seen. Especially the east of the Netherlands was well endowed. The ring ouzels flew along in the large flow of redwings and other thrushes, which earlier this week migrated massively.

Short-eared owl, purple sandpipers, black redstart


Feral pigeons, Scheveningen, 18 october 2014

On 18 October 2014, on the southern jetty of Scheveningen harbour, there were more birds than just ruddy turnstones. Like these two feral pigeons at the end of the jetty.

They had been ‘kissing'; unfortunately just before the photo.

We walked back.

Northern wheatear, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

This migrating northern wheatear standing on a rock.

Short-eared owl, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

Then, an even more special migratory bird: a short-eared owl passed the jetty!

Short-eared owl, North Sea, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

Unusual, to see this uncommon bird, a land bird, flying south over the North Sea waves. Two herring gulls harassed it.

Purple sandpiper, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

Also, purple sandpipers on the jetty rocks. Some awake.

Purple sandpiper sleeping, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

And some sleepy.

Black redstart, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

We were back on the continent. Not far from the beginning of the jetty, this black redstart on concrete near a sand dune.

We went to the ‘Vulkaan‘ (the Volcano), a high sand dune south of The Hague. It is a good vantage point for seeing bird migration. The many birdwatchers present saw, eg, song thrushes and mistle thrushes fly past.

Ruddy turnstones, other birds, at Scheveningen harbour


Ruddy turnstones, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

This photo shows a flock of ruddy turnstones at the southern jetty of the harbour of Scheveningen, The Hague’s port.

Before we arrived there on 18 October 2014, a great cormorant sitting on a pole in the canal.

On a building near the harbour, a kestrel sitting.

Much bird migration today: groups of yellow wagtails, starlings and chaffinches flying past.

On a mast in the harbour, a great black-backed gull.

An oystercatcher flying.

Ruddy turnstone, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

On the jetty, ruddy turnstones; and a few purple sandpipers.

Ruddy turnstone feeding, Scheveningen, 18 October 2014

A puddle on the jetty. Turnstones; and a rock pipit drinking.

Ruddy turnstone, Scheveningen jetty, 18 October 2014

Stay tuned for more Scheveningen harbour birds.

Ruddy turnstone, on Scheveningen jetty, 18 October 2014

Good bee news from Amsterdam, but …


This video from England says about itself:

Miner bee. Dasypoda altercator characterised by its hairy yellow legs.

A solitary miner bee digs out its hole with its hairy I think back legs.

On 19 October 2014, Remco Daalder, Amsterdam city ecologist, was awarded the Jan Wolkers Prize. This prize is named after famous Dutch artist and author, including about natural history, Jan Wolkers. The Jan Wolkers Prize is for the best natural history book of the year in the Netherlands. Remco Daalder’s book is about swifts.

The prize was awarded in Naturalis museum in Leiden. Remco Daalder said there that things went well for bees in Amsterdam. ‘A threefold increase since ten years ago’.

A 21 September 2014 report from Amsterdam daily Het Parool says that this year, three bee species have been seen for the first time ever in Amsterdam: Heriades truncorum; Chelostoma rapunculi; and Osmia caerulescens.

Het Parool writes, interviewing Remco Daalder’s colleague, Arie Koster (translated):

My first observation is that things go very well with the wild bees in the city, I’m pretty excited. Bees which were rare fifteen years ago I find in various places now. Dasypoda altercator, Colletes daviesanus and red-footed leaf-cutter bees are now numerous. “According to Koster a field like this twenty years ago was unthinkable.

“Everything was mowed down and city gardens were sprayed with poison. In the eighties, wild bees in the city were dying. Mid-nineties, there was change and many municipalities began with ecological management. Apparently, the past fifteen years also made ​​a big impact. I notice the effect”.

However, meanwhile, in the Dutch countryside still lots of insecticides are used, killing many honeybees.

Texel, bye bye on 10 October!


This is a video about birds on Texel island.

After 9 October, Friday 10 October 2014 was our last day on Texel.

Back on the ferry to Den Helder.

Many black-headed gulls, some herring gulls and a few lesser black-backed gulls flying along with the ship.

Then, jackdaws. Not seabirds. A sign we are close to landing on the continent.