Good Guatemalan birds and amphibians news update


This video says about itself:

A singing male Pink-headed Warbler, Ergaticus (formerly Cardellina) versicolor, at the roadside edge of a large forest patch on the Ocosingo Highway in Chiapas, Mexico, on March 21, 2014.

From Wildlife Extra:

An important lagoon and montane forest property in Guatemala is purchased by conservation charity

Thanks to a donation from Puro Coffee the World Land Trust has the funds to help their partner Fundación Para el Ecodesarrollo y la Conservación (FUNDAECO) purchase Laguna Brava in western Guatemala.

The property measures 1,186 acres (480 hectares), with the lake (Yolnabaj) takes up just under half the area of the property. The remainder is made up of some of the last remnants of the region’s montane tropical karst forest on the northern, southern and eastern side of the lake.

It supports many rare species including amphibians and birds and is home to three species of tree frog that are listed as Critically Endangered by IUCN, as well Lincoln’s Climbing Salamander, which is registered as Near Threatened.

The forest surrounding the lagoon hosts 72 different bird species including the Highlands Guan (Penelopina nigra), and the Pink-headed Warbler (Ergaticus versicolor), both registered by IUCN as Vulnerable.

“FUNDAECO’s determination to create this reserve, which forms the first protected reserve in the region, will help many previously unprotected but Critically Endangered species,” said Charlotte Beckham, WLT’s Conservation Programmes Co-ordinator.

Read all about the conservation charity World Land Trust and the work it does HERE.

Birds, 100 years after extinction of passenger pigeons


100 years after extinction of passenger pigeons

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

August 30, 2014

Look for an important story about bird conservation in this weekend’s New York Times Sunday Review. In his op-ed marking 100 years since the passing of Martha, the last Passenger Pigeon on earth, Cornell Lab of Ornithology director John Fitzpatrick imagines Martha asking, “Have you learned anything from my passing?”

Dr. Fitzpatrick’s answer: yes we have, but we need to do much more. Read about citizen-science efforts, such as eBird, that help scientists track how birds are faring and correct course before species become imperiled. Learn about the 2014 State of the Birds Report, to be released in Washington, DC, on September 9 by the Cornell Lab and partners. Based on citizen-science data, the report highlights which species are rebounding where conservation efforts are working, and which species urgently need our help.

Thank you for your passion for birds and conservation. Your involvement and support are helping to fuel an entirely new conservation movement–one in which thousands of bird watchers, scientists, and concerned citizens are taking action together to help prevent more species from sliding toward extinction.

Please share John Fitzpatrick’s op-ed with your friends, family, and fellow bird lovers to help raise awareness about the plight of birds and how your support of the Cornell Lab is shaping a better future for birds and wildlife.

Sincerely,


Miyoko Chu
Senior director of Communications
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Best birdseed for North American birds


This video from Indiana in the USA says about itself:

Winter Birds’ Feeding Frenzy

5 January 2013

My pagoda sunflower seed bird feeder served as the perfect feeding station, making this feeding frenzy a birdwatchers’ delight. Watch as Bluejays, Northern Cardinals, Chickadees, House Finches, Goldfinches, Tufted Titmice, Nuthatches, and House Sparrows all dart in to feed and take a spin on the pagoda feeder, while Red-bellied and Downy Woodpeckers dine on the nearby suet. Listen as the Pileated Woodpecker comes in close to scold from a nearby tree, but stays out of camera’s view. Notice, as the days get longer, the Goldfinches are already starting to get some yellow back.

From eNature Blog in the USA:

What’s The Best Birdseed To Put In Your Feeder This Fall?

Posted on Wednesday, August 27, 2014 by eNature

Fall is all but in the air in many parts of the country—and it’s a time of the year when many people think about feeding birds in their backyards. We’re not sure why this happens only in autumn, because feeding birds throughout the year has many rewards. Yet, autumn is the time when bird seed sales are held, and bird feeders are promoted most widely.

Perhaps, it’s the notion that birds need more help in cold weather, and therefore, bird feeding is more popular in winter. Whatever the reason, the bird feeding season is on, and people are buying lots of bird seeds.

The kind of seeds you offer backyard birds makes a difference, because all birds don’t eat the same foods.

If there is one kind of seed that is most attractive to the greatest number of backyard birds, it would be sunflower in any form. Sunflower seeds are relished by finches, grosbeaks, cardinals, jays, and even some species of woodpeckers.

The two most popular forms of sunflower seeds for birds are the black oil sunflower seed, which is in the shell, and the hulled (medium cracked) sunflower seed, which is out of the shell. eNature’s bird expert, George Harrison, tells us that if he could feed only one kind of bird food in his backyard, it would be hulled sunflower seeds.

Other popular seeds for finches, include niger (thistle), also spelled nyjer, a tiny black seed that is offered in a tube feeder with tiny port holes. Safflower seeds are a favorite among cardinals, doves, and house finches. And the various wild bird seed mixes are eaten by sparrows, doves, juncos, and blackbirds.

So don’t miss out on having a busy backyard this fall. If you leave bird seed out, it’s almost certain to get found.

What do you do this time of year to attract or (as some of us like to say) take care of your local birds?

We always appreciate hearing your hints, suggestions and stories. Just leave your thoughts below in the comments.

And have fun with the birds this fall!

Black-winged stilt, video


This is a video about a black-winged stilt, foraging in Zeeland province in the Netherlands.

Karen Davidse made the video.

Bahrain bridled terns


This is a bridled tern video.

In Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, not just cruel regime torture of human rights activists. Also, beautiful birds, like bridled terns.

From Focusing On Wildlife, with photos there:

August 28 2014

Bridled Terns – Al Jarrim Island South (Bahrain)

The Bridled Tern Sterna anaethetus is a common summer breeding visitor to offshore islands in the Gulf and Red Sea. Brian Meadows (Bull B.O.C 2003) mentioned 175 pairs breeding on islets north of Yanbu al-Bahr 18 June 1993. Summer visitor to all coasts nesting on islands occasionally.

In 1988 Jennings visited the Farasan Islands and found the species to be a very common breeding tern and a survey of summer breeding seabirds by SF Newton in 1994 in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea found they were the most abundant and widespread breeding seabird. The aerial count total of just under 20,000 is likely to be a gross underestimate.

Most nests were under bushes but a few small colonies on Farasan use rock overhangs on cliffs in the absence of vegetation. Both the al Wajh and Farasan Archipelagoes hold large populations and the species is abundant on the well vegetated outer islands of the Farasan Bank where it co-occurs with Brown Noddy. Clutches were always of a single egg and hatching commenced in mid June.

In the Gulf large numbers breed on the Bahrain and Saudi Arabian offshore islands with eggs hatching in early to Mid-June. Karan(27°44’N, 49°50’E) is the largest of the six coral islands measuring 128 hectares in size (2025m x 625m).

This island has the largest breeding population of Lesser Crested terns in Saudi Arabia as well as good numbers of Bridled Terns and White-cheeked terns and a small number of Swift Terns. Jana (27°22’N, 49°54’E) is the second largest island being 33 hectares in size (1105m x 300m).

Large numbers of Bridled tern and small numbers of Lesser Crested Terns and Swift Terns nest here. Juraid (27°11’N, 49°52’E) is the third largest coral island measuring 20 hectares in size (732 x 282m) and holds the largest breeding population of Bridled Terns in Saudi Arabia, with good numbers of breeding Lesser Crested Terns and White-cheeked Terns.

Kurain (27°39’N, 49°50’E) is the second smallest island with a size of 8 hectares (312m x 251m). Large numbers of Lesser Crested Terns along with good numbers of Bridled Terns and White-cheeked Terns nest on this island.

Batumi, Georgia, big birds of prey migration


This video from Georgia says about itself:

Honey Buzzard migration, Batumi 2013-09-03

A short film of migrating Honey Buzzards in Batumi. The bottleneck of Batumi is probably one of the best places to be if you wanna see a lot of migrating raptors. In early september, the peak time of honey buzzards occurs and thousands of Honey Buzzards migrate.

As this blog noted, bird migration counters in the Netherlands considered yesterday, 27 August 2014, a good day, including 451 honey buzzards.

However, there are always other days, better than good days.

Today, 28 August, in Saghalvasho near Batumi, in Georgia, 81,666 honey buzzards were counted!

Other species there today: black stork 5. White stork 20. Black kite 246. Marsh harrier 64. Pallid harrier 1. Montagu’s harrier 288. Booted eagle 3. European roller 108.

Birds of prey migrating in the Netherlands


This video is about raptor migration in Panama.

The Dutch SOVON ornithologists report about migration of birds of prey.

Yesterday, 27 August 2017, was a good day for raptor migration.

451 honey buzzards were counted. And 278 marsh harriers; though most individuals of this species migrate in September.

There were 38 ospreys. And four Montagu’s harriers; one hen harrier, and a pallid harrier (claimed; experts still have to find out whether it was really that rare species).