Humpback whales, what do they eat?


This video from California in the USA is called Surfer Almost Swallowed by Whale.

From eNature Blog in the USA:

What Does A Humpback Whale Really Eat For Dinner?

Posted on Thursday, August 28, 2014 by eNature

Despite the title of the video above, Humpbacks don’t eat surfers!

Eves so, that video has received lots of attention around the internet when it appeared— and for good reason.

It shows a surfer’s VERY close encounter with a humpback whale off the beaches of Santa Cruz, in Northern California.

But it’s also interesting because it’s a great close-up view of how a Humpback feeds and the sort of marine life that makes up its diet.

How To Eat Without Teeth?

Humpbacks are baleen whales and have no teeth. They feed by using the large plates of baleen in their mouths to filter out shrimp-like krill and other small creatures from the water. Plated grooves in the whale’s mouth allow water that was taken in to easily drain, leaving a mouth full of dinner.

But most folks don’t realize that baleen whales such has humpbacks also consume fish— mainly small schooling fish they hunt in same fashion as krill.

In the video you can clearly see lots of small prey fish scattering in all directions just before and as the whale breaches. (Double click on the video if you want to see a bigger version of it). You an also see the whale’s baleen plates and the water rushing from its mouth as it filters out its prey.

Blowing Bubbles For Dinner

Humpbacks are energetic hunters, taking krill and small schooling fish such as herring, mackerel, pollock, and haddock. They’re also quite clever and have been known to use a technique called bubble net feeding.

A whale or group of whales swims in a shrinking circle blowing bubbles below a school of prey, encircling and confining the school in an ever-smaller cylinder. The whales then suddenly swim upward through the ‘net’ with their mouths open, filtering huge quantities of water and capturing thousands of fish in one gulp.

It’s a pretty amazing thing to observe…

And one other fun thing to note in the video is all the seabirds following the whales as they feed. These birds know that breaching whales panic fish and make them easy pickings for an alert bird. Looking for flocks of seabirds working the ocean’s surface is time-honored way for fisherman to locate schools— and for whale watchers to find whales.

Have you had a chance to see Humpbacks or other whales? We always love to hear your stories.

Fallow deer alpha male, video


This video is about an alpha male fallow deer which does not want two younger males to come too close.

E. Neuteboom made the video in the Amsterdamse Waterleiding Duinen in the Netherlands.

Black-winged stilt, video


This is a video about a black-winged stilt, foraging in Zeeland province in the Netherlands.

Karen Davidse made the video.

Great pond snails in love, video


This is a video about two great pond snails in the Netherlands in a romantic mood.

The snails are hermaphrodites: each snail is both male and female.

Jos van Zijl made the video.

Red fox marks its territory, video


This is a video about a red fox marking its territory with smell signals in Meijendel nature reserve in the Netherlands.

Lammert Heine made the video.

Bahrain bridled terns


This is a bridled tern video.

In Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, not just cruel regime torture of human rights activists. Also, beautiful birds, like bridled terns.

From Focusing On Wildlife, with photos there:

August 28 2014

Bridled Terns – Al Jarrim Island South (Bahrain)

The Bridled Tern Sterna anaethetus is a common summer breeding visitor to offshore islands in the Gulf and Red Sea. Brian Meadows (Bull B.O.C 2003) mentioned 175 pairs breeding on islets north of Yanbu al-Bahr 18 June 1993. Summer visitor to all coasts nesting on islands occasionally.

In 1988 Jennings visited the Farasan Islands and found the species to be a very common breeding tern and a survey of summer breeding seabirds by SF Newton in 1994 in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea found they were the most abundant and widespread breeding seabird. The aerial count total of just under 20,000 is likely to be a gross underestimate.

Most nests were under bushes but a few small colonies on Farasan use rock overhangs on cliffs in the absence of vegetation. Both the al Wajh and Farasan Archipelagoes hold large populations and the species is abundant on the well vegetated outer islands of the Farasan Bank where it co-occurs with Brown Noddy. Clutches were always of a single egg and hatching commenced in mid June.

In the Gulf large numbers breed on the Bahrain and Saudi Arabian offshore islands with eggs hatching in early to Mid-June. Karan(27°44’N, 49°50’E) is the largest of the six coral islands measuring 128 hectares in size (2025m x 625m).

This island has the largest breeding population of Lesser Crested terns in Saudi Arabia as well as good numbers of Bridled Terns and White-cheeked terns and a small number of Swift Terns. Jana (27°22’N, 49°54’E) is the second largest island being 33 hectares in size (1105m x 300m).

Large numbers of Bridled tern and small numbers of Lesser Crested Terns and Swift Terns nest here. Juraid (27°11’N, 49°52’E) is the third largest coral island measuring 20 hectares in size (732 x 282m) and holds the largest breeding population of Bridled Terns in Saudi Arabia, with good numbers of breeding Lesser Crested Terns and White-cheeked Terns.

Kurain (27°39’N, 49°50’E) is the second smallest island with a size of 8 hectares (312m x 251m). Large numbers of Lesser Crested Terns along with good numbers of Bridled Terns and White-cheeked Terns nest on this island.

Batumi, Georgia, big birds of prey migration


This video from Georgia says about itself:

Honey Buzzard migration, Batumi 2013-09-03

A short film of migrating Honey Buzzards in Batumi. The bottleneck of Batumi is probably one of the best places to be if you wanna see a lot of migrating raptors. In early september, the peak time of honey buzzards occurs and thousands of Honey Buzzards migrate.

As this blog noted, bird migration counters in the Netherlands considered yesterday, 27 August 2014, a good day, including 451 honey buzzards.

However, there are always other days, better than good days.

Today, 28 August, in Saghalvasho near Batumi, in Georgia, 81,666 honey buzzards were counted!

Other species there today: black stork 5. White stork 20. Black kite 246. Marsh harrier 64. Pallid harrier 1. Montagu’s harrier 288. Booted eagle 3. European roller 108.