Indonesians demand compensation for massacre by Dutch soldiers


This video says about itself:

14 September 2011

A Dutch court is expected to rule if survivors of a massacre carried out more than 60 years ago will get compensation.

According to Indonesian researchers, Dutch troops wiped out almost the entire male population of a village in West Java, two years before the former colony declared independence in 1949.

No, Indonesia declared independence in 1945. However, the Dutch government only recognized independence after four years of colonial war in 1949.

Most Indonesians do not know about the massacre that took place in Rawagede.

Only recently has a monument been built to remind residents that Dutch soldiers killed all the men of the village.

The only living witnesses are now in their 80s, and illiterate, after having to fend for themselves following the deaths of their husbands.

“There were dead bodies everywhere, many of which we found in the river after the shooting stopped,” said Cawi, a survivor.

Of the nine widows and survivors who have filed the case, three have died while waiting for the verdict.

The Dutch government has admitted that war crimes were committed in Rawagede but it says the survivors filed their claims for compensation too late.

They should have done this within 30 years after the atrocities were committed, says the Dutch government.

It is now up to the judge to decide whether it is justified to have a time limit on war crimes.

The massacre in Rawagede is not the only village where the Netherlands has an unresolved dark history.

Al Jazeera’s Step Vaessen reports from Rawagede.

Translated from daily De Telegraaf in the Netherlands:

Thursday 28 August 2014 11:25
|
Children in Sulawesi saw executions

THE HAGUE – Monji saw on January 28, 1947 as a boy of 9 or 10 years old, that Indonesian men from Suppa village were beaten, stripped and shot by Dutch troops in South Sulawesi. The bodies were piled up and buried in holes in the ground. Eventually, 208 people were killed.

Another child who witnessed the extrajudicial killings was Paturusi (82) from the village Bulukumba. She saw that her father, a civil servant, had fled into the forest but had came out again. He was then executed. This Thursday they are two of the three children of then entering the court in The Hague. They demand a compensation of 20,000 euros from the Dutch government.

The government does not want to grant the children of executed people any compensation, as previously happened to widows of men killed.

According to lawyer Liesbeth Zegveld a statute of limitations does not apply. The children are also, like before, the widows, survivors directly involved and they are just as much victims of executions as widows. According to Zegveld it has been a very traumatic experience for the children to see their dead fathers.

Zegveld represents five children and 18 widows who have not yet received any compensation. … The widows have refused a settlement because the attorney’s fees would be deducted from their remuneration.

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4 thoughts on “Indonesians demand compensation for massacre by Dutch soldiers

  1. If the consequence of outright murder by a European power, it it almost a joke the Dutch, government having to address this criminal activity within living memory of those having survived, now long overdue, not only do have to bare in mind the original atrocity, furthermore such a long duration, reflecting on the Dutch government macabre attitude of diminishing compensation for those who have survived.
    Interesting enough, the fact that you have great cultural contributions as the Dutch society have had in their past, has little effect upon the evil a society can inflict on those who are considered less as human beings.

  2. Pingback: Dutch king continued slave trade after official ban | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: SS war criminals sentenced for massacre in Marzabotto, Italy | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Indonesian widows get Dutch compensation for murdered husbands | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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