British anti-World War I Sassoon poem was censored


This video from Britain is called Suicide in the Trenches by Siegfried Sassoon: Read by Stephen Graham | Remembering World War 1.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Unpublished Siegfried Sassoon poems get first reading – and show anti-war sentiment was toned down before publication

Phrases like ‘you’re great at murder’ were later scratched from ‘Atrocities

Claudia Pritchard

Sunday 06 July 2014

Two unpublished poems by Siegfried Sassoon will be given a public reading for the first time today by the actor Samuel West, among them the first draft of “Atrocities”, in which Sassoon is much more direct about the visceral act of killing the enemy than in the later, published version.

Phrases that were later scratched include “you’re great at murder”. And the final lines, which the owner of the original manuscript, Annette Campbell-White, says finish “quite limply” with “still talking big and boozing in a bar”, contain the phrase “gulp their blood in ghoulish dreams”. Where Sassoon originally wrote “How did you kill them?”, he later revised this to “How did you do them in?”

Ms Campbell-White, a Sassoon specialist and collector, bought the poems at auction last year. “The war department or publishers thought that ‘Atrocities’ was a little too harsh, and so when it was published it was modified,” she said. At the time of the Bonhams sale she also acquired a large exercise book, Sassoon’s “daybook” from the 1920s, containing two dozen or so poems illustrated by the poet himself. Among them is a homage to Beethoven – “hail him heroic, honour him as great” – which West will also read at a music and poetry event in Buckinghamshire.

“The poems are very good. I am amazed they have never been published,” said Ms Campbell-White. “They are about all aspects of life, nature … a sort of poetic diary.”

Today’s event, called “Peace in Our Time?” forms part of the Garsington Opera summer season in a theatre in the grounds of the home of millionaire art collector Mark Getty, heir to John Paul Getty, at Wormsley, near High Wycombe. Garsington has an association with Sassoon through the socialite Lady Ottoline Morrell, owner of Garsington Manor from 1914 to 1928. It was at the manor that the operas were staged, from 1989 to 2011, before moving to Wormsley.

At Garsington Hall, which he visited regularly, Sassoon was encouraged by Lady Ottoline to take a stand against the way in which the First World War was proceeding. He had served with distinction until openly questioning the purpose of the war in 1917. He had received the Military Cross, but threw his medal into the Mersey. Only admission to the psychiatric hospital at Craiglockhart near Edinburgh spared him a court martial. He died in 1967.

Garsington was a haven for artists, intellectuals and conscientious objectors, including D H Lawrence and Lytton Strachey. Conscientious objectors, including members of the Bloomsbury circle, escaped prosecution by working on the farm there.

In 1917, Sassoon wrote a letter called “Finished With the War: A Soldier’s Declaration”. In it he said: “I am making this statement as an act of wilful defiance of military authority because I believe that the war is being deliberately prolonged by those who have the power to end it. I am a soldier, convinced that I am acting on behalf of soldiers. I believe that the war upon which I entered as a war of defence and liberation has now become a war of aggression and conquest. I believe that the purposes for which I and my fellow soldiers entered upon this war should have been so clearly stated as to have made it impossible to change them and that had this been done the objects… would now be attainable by negotiation.”

“Sassoon’s best poetry was written at the time of the war,” said Ms Campbell-White. “It was something to do with the stress, adrenaline and terror of that time that made the writing of the First World War poets so extraordinary. Sassoon remained a fine poet, but if Rupert Brooke, for example, had come back, what would he have become?”

Dave Sherry tells Tomáš Tengely-Evans he wants his new book Empire and Revolution to take on the elite’s attempt to whitewash the First World War: here.

About these ads

7 thoughts on “British anti-World War I Sassoon poem was censored

  1. Pingback: British anti-World War I Sassoon poem was censored | The Socialist

  2. Pingback: First world war in a German novel | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. SIEGFRIED SASSOON poem on World War I

    HAVE YOU FORGOTTEN YET?

    For the world’s events have rumbled on since those
    gagged days,
    Like traffic checked awhile at the crossing of the ways:
    And the haunted gap in your minds has filled with
    thoughts that flow
    Like clouds in the lit heavens of life; and you are a man
    reprieved to go,
    Taking your peaceful share of Time, with joy to spare.
    BUT THE PAST IS JUST THE SAME—AND WAR’S A
    BLOODY GAME . . .
    HAVE YOU FORGOTTEN YET?
    LOOK DOWN, AND SWEAR BY THE SLAIN OF THE
    WAR THAT YOU’LL NEVER FORGET.

    Do you remember the dark months you held the
    sector at Mametz—
    The nights you watched and wired and dug and piled
    sandbags on parapet?
    Do you remember the rats, and the stench
    Of corpses rotting in front of the front line trench,—
    And dawn coming dirty-white, and chill with a hopeless
    rain?
    DO YOU EVER STOP AND ASK, “IS IT GOING TO
    HAPPEN AGAIN?*’.

    Do you remember that hour of din before the attack,—
    And the anger, the blind compassion that seized and
    shook you then
    As you peered at the doomed and haggard faces of the
    men?
    Do you remember the stretcher cases lurching back
    With dying eyes and lolling heads,—those ashen grey
    Mask of the lads who once were keen and kind and gay?

    HAVE YOU FORGOTTEN YET?
    LOOK UP AND SWEAR BY THE STARS IN THE SKY
    THAT YOU’LL NEVER FORGET.

  4. Pingback: British anti-World War I MP John Burns commemorated | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Pingback: David Cameron re-writes World War I history for 21st century war propaganda | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  6. Pingback: War is not peace, lesson of World War I | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  7. Pingback: World War I start, don´t celebrate, interview | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s