Hummingbirds and ruddy treerunner in Costa Rica


White-throated mountain-gem female, 27 March 2014

Apart from the resplendent quetzals, there were of course also other beautiful birds on 27 March 2014 near San Gerardo de Dota in Costa Rica. Like this female white-throated mountain-gem hummingbird.

White-throated mountain-gem male, 27 March 2014

And this male white-throated mountain-gem. A bird species, restricted to Costa Rica and Panama.

Green-crowned brilliant female, 27 March 2014

And this green-crowned brilliant female.

We will continue the story with what happened after we saw the tufted flycatcher mentioned earlier.

A clay-coloured thrush.

A yellow-thighed finch.

A black-thighed grosbeak. A species which lives only in the highlands of Costa Rica and western Panama.

Near the feeder: a green violetear hummingbird.

We went higher up the mountain. An oak forest grows there. During the last Ice Age, oak forests covered bigger parts of Costa Rica. as the climate warmed, the oaks retreated to the higher parts of mountains. They developed into endemic species because of their isolation.

An acorn woodpecker.

A black-faced solitaire calls.

A collared redstart.

Ruddy treeruner, 27 March 2014

Then, on a branch near a stream, a ruddy treerunner. One of many species, limited to Costa Rica and western Panama.

Ruddy treeruner on tree, 27 March 2014

A female barred becard.

A black-cheeked warbler; also limited to Costa Rica and Panama.

A sooty-capped bush tanager.

Yellow-thighed finch, 27 March 2014

A yellow-thighed finch.

A flame-throated warbler.

And a flame-coloured tanager.

Spot-crowned woodcreeper, 27 March 2014

Then, a spot-crowned woodcreeper.

Sooty-capped bush tanager, 27 March 2014

Among the last birds of the morning: sooty-capped bush tanagers; feeding on berries.

And a yellowish flycatcher.

After the morning came, of course, the afternoon. So, stay tuned!

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4 thoughts on “Hummingbirds and ruddy treerunner in Costa Rica

  1. Pingback: Hummingbirds, woodpeckers and thrushes in Costa Rica | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Ruddy-capped nightingale thrush and emerald toucanet in Costa Rica | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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