Rainforest sloths and toucans in Costa Rica


This video says about itself:

Filmed at Selva Verde Lodge in Costa Rica, this Nikon’s BATV episode features the plight of the Great Green Macaw.

A list of birds at Selva Verde is here.

Costa Rica, 16 March 2014.

After yesterday, we were near the Sarapiqui river.

At 4:50 the sound of mantled howler monkeys woke me up.

An orange-billed sparrow after getting up.

From the bus: a great-tailed grackle. A great kiskadee on a wire.

Near the entrance of La Selva Biological Station: a chestnut-sided warbler on a tree. A species, nesting in North America and wintering here.

In other trees, a green honeycreeper. A pied puffbird.

A boat-billed flycatcher.

Masked tityra male and female, 16 March 2014

A masked tityra couple. On the photo, the male on the left; the female on the right.

Golden-hooded tanager, 16 March 2014

A golden-hooded tanager.

A buff-throated saltator cleans its feathers.

So does a social flycatcher.

A group of red-lored parrots in yet another tree.

In the same tree, a juvenile Baltimore oriole cleans its feathers.

Keel-billed toucans, 16 March 2014

Keel-billed toucans. The second biggest toucan species in Costa Rica.

Keel-billed toucan flying, 16 March 2014

A crested guan.

On wires: greyish saltator. A female shiny cowbird. A tropical kingbird. A grey-capped flycatcher.

Mangrove swallow, 16 March 2014

Two mangrove swallows.

A northern rough-winged swallow flying.

Rufous-tailed hummingbird, 16 March 2014

A rufous-tailed hummingbird.

In a tree, a long-tailed tyrant. A plain-coloured tanager cleans its feathers.

A small flock of chestnut-headed oropendolas flies past.

On a branch, a tropical pewee.

Bananaquit. Variable seedeater.

A green iguana in a tree.

A slaty-tailed trogon couple nests in a termite nest in a tree close to the entrance. The birds are enlarging their nest. The termites don’t mind them. After the resplendent quetzal, slaty-tailed trogons are among the biggest trogon species.

Band-backed wren, La Selva, 16 March 2014

A band-backed wren. The bird on the photo was banded for research.

Brown-throated three-toed sloth, 16 March 2014

In a tree, a brown-throated three-toed sloth with a baby.

Brown-throated three-toed sloth with baby, 16 March 2014

A broad-winged hawk flying.

Near a bridge across the river, greater white-lined bats resting.

A collared peccary on a lawn on the other side.

Collared aracari, 16 March 2014

And a collared aracari in a tree.

And the biggest woodpecker species of Costa Rica: a pale-billed woodpecker.

A much smaller bird: an olive-backed euphonia.

There were not only birds, but also reptiles and amphibians there. So, stay tuned!

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14 thoughts on “Rainforest sloths and toucans in Costa Rica

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