African bird count update


This video is called Some Birds of The Gambia 1.

And here is the sequel.

BirdLife in the Netherlands reports about the big international count of coastal birds, all the way from the Netherlands to South Africa. 1,500 people counted in thirty countries. I have ranked the reports from the north to the south.

From Morocco:

Like every winter, GREPOM BirdLife in Morocco did waterfowl counts. We will visit 150 wetlands throughout the country. Until now we have done 70 and 98 water bird species were observed. A preliminary analysis indicates that we have record numbers of wintering shovelers, red-crested pochard ducks, great cormorants and ferruginous ducks. While not as many teal and shelducks were counted as in previous years. Rarities we saw as well, like magnificent frigatebird, brent goose, blue-winged teal, purple sandpiper and ring-billed gull.

In Mauritania, there were 285 black-winged stilts in a small lakelet in the capital Nouakchot. In Diawling national park, for the first time since five years ago, women participated in the counting. There were more birds there than last year: 175,601 versus 144,140.

This video is called Kartong Bird Observatory, in Gambia, west Africa.

In the Gambia, in Tanji Bird Reserve, there were 2,000 grey-headed gulls, an Audouin’s gull, two kelp gulls and five tern species.

This video is about Tanji beach.

Balla Moussa in Guinea reported an osprey and lesser flamingoes.

Papanie Bai Sesay wrote from Sierra Leone:

Our water bird count in Sierra Leone had a flying start. Many species of waders and over fifty water bird species at Yawri bay, Sherbro river and Turtle Island. Today, we have discovered an important place upstream in the Sherbro river with lots of waterfowl. Yesterday we had three African skimmers behind York island.

In Ghana, a little grebe and a black-tailed godwit.

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3 thoughts on “African bird count update

  1. Pingback: Vlieland island female spoonbill’s travels unveiled | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Sociable weaver birds’ nesting colonies, new research | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Senegalese and Dutch black-tailed godwit research | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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