4 thoughts on “West Virginians still without drinking water

  1. Pingback: West Virginia water pollution scandal | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Erin Brockovich on West Virginia water pollution | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. For six horrific days, toxic coal ash gushed into North Carolina’s Dan River. Ash from coal-burning power plants is full of toxic heavy metals like arsenic, mercury, and lead – that the coal companies just dump in pits and ponds, with no plan for safe disposal or cleanup.

    Tell the EPA we have waited long enough, and that it’s time to finalize new coal ash protections.

    Thanks for all you do!

    Bob Fertik

    —–

    Sierra Club – Explore, enjoy and protect the planet
    Dear Friend,
    Coal ash is toxic waste —
    Keep it out of our water!

    Take action!
    Photo: Catawba Riverkeeper

    Take action!

    This has to stop.

    For six days in January, toxic coal ash gushed into North Carolina’s Dan River, turning the water into “gray sludge” and leaving layers of toxic muck on the river banks.[1]

    Ash from coal-burning power plants is full of toxic heavy metals like arsenic, mercury, and lead — that the coal companies then dump in pits and ponds, with no plan for safe disposal or cleanup. In fact, the coal plant that dumped this toxic waste in North Carolina isn’t even operating anymore. They just left their toxic waste sitting by the side of the river — because they could.

    Tell the EPA to finally protect our rivers and our communities from coal’s toxic waste.

    North Carolina isn’t alone. There are more than 1,100 coal ash sites nationwide. In some places, the heaps of toxic waste are so close to communities that a stiff breeze sends clouds of ash over people’s homes.[2] In others, the ash sits in unlined ponds, leaching chemicals into the groundwater.

    For the last four years, the EPA has been sitting on a national safeguard that could have prevented this disaster — it would put an end to the open pits, the leaking ponds, and the abandoned toxic waste. But delay has followed delay, and that means the coal plant in North Carolina wasn’t breaking any federal rules when it stashed its toxic waste in an unlined pond by the Dan River.

    We need the EPA to finish a strong national safeguard that ensures no more coal ash ponds like this are built in the future, and also cleans up and closes the existing ones.

    No more delays. Tell the EPA to finish a strong, meaningful, and federally enforceable safeguard against toxic coal ash!

    Thank you for all you do,

    Mary Anne Hitt
    Beyond Coal Campaign Director
    Sierra Club

    Notes:
    1) NC river turns to gray sludge after coal ash spill, Associated Press, February 5, 2014
    2) The Cost of Coal — Nevada, Sierra Club: The Cost of Coal

  4. Pingback: Detroit residents’ human right to water violated | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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