United States cats kill billions of birds


This video is called Garden Maintenance: How to Repel House Cats From Outdoor Bird Feeders.

From Wildlife Extra:

Cats kill 2.4 billion birds and 12 billion mammals every year in US alone

A new peer-reviewed study published and authored by scientists from two of the world’s leading science and wildlife organizations – the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) – has found that bird and mammal mortality caused by outdoor cats is much higher than has been widely reported, with annual bird mortality now
estimated to be 1.4 to 3.7 billion and mammal mortality likely 6.9 – 20.7 billion individuals in the US alone.

Outdoor cats: Single greatest source of human-caused mortality for birds and mammals, says new study

January 2013. A new peer-reviewed study published and authored by scientists from two of the world’s leading science and wildlife organizations – the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) – has found that bird and mammal mortality caused by outdoor cats is much higher than has been widely reported, with annual bird mortality now estimated to be 1.4 to 3.7 billion and mammal mortality likely 6.9 – 20.7 billion individuals in the US alone.

The study, which offers the most comprehensive analysis of information on the issue of outdoor cat predation, was published in the online research journal Nature Communications and is based on a review of 90 previous studies. The study was authored by Dr. Peter Marra and Scott Loss, research scientists at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and by Tom Will from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Division of Migratory Birds.

Propblem is even worse than previously suspected

According to Dr. George Fenwick, President of American Bird Conservancy, one of the leading bird conservation organizations in the U.S. and a group that has called for action on this issue for many years, “This study, which employed scientifically rigorous standards for data inclusion, demonstrates that the issue of cat predation on birds and mammals is an even bigger environmental and ecological threat than we thought. No estimates of any other anthropogenic [human-caused] mortality source approach the bird mortality this study calculated for cat predation.”

“To maintain the integrity of our ecosystems, we have to conserve the animals that play integral roles in those ecosystems. Every time we lose another bird species or suppress their population numbers, we’re altering the very ecosystems that we depend on as humans. This issue clearly needs immediate conservation attention,” he said further.

Carnage

“The very high credibility of this study should finally put to rest the misguided notions that outdoor cats represent some harmless, new component to the natural environment. The carnage that outdoor cats inflict is staggering and can no longer be ignored or dismissed. This is a wake-up call for cat owners and communities to get serious about this problem before even more ecological damage occurs,” Fenwick said.

The study’s estimate of bird mortality far exceeds any previously estimated U.S. figure for cats. In fact, this magnitude of mortality may exceed all other direct sources of anthropogenic bird and mammal mortality combined. Other bird mortality sources would include collisions with windows, buildings, communication towers, vehicles, and pesticide poisoning.

2.4 billion birds and 12 billion mammals killed by cats

The study estimated that the median number of birds killed by cats annually is 2.4 billion and the median number of mammals killed is 12.3 billion. About 69 percent of the bird mortality from cat predation and 89 percent of the mammal mortality was from un-owned cats. Un-owned cats are defined to include farm/barn cats, strays that are fed but not granted access to human habitations, cats in subsidized colonies, and cats that are completely feral.

Extinction cause

Free-ranging cats on islands have caused or contributed to 33 (14 percent) of the modern bird, mammal, and reptile extinctions recorded by the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of threatened animals and plant species.

Native species make up the majority of the birds preyed upon by cats. On average, only 33 percent of bird prey items identified to species were non-native species in 10 studies. Studies of mammals in suburban and rural areas found that 75-100 percent of mammalian prey were native mice, shrews, voles, squirrels, and rabbits, all of which serve as food sources for birds of prey such as hawks, owls, and eagles.

The study charges that, “Despite these harmful effects, policies for management of free-ranging cat populations and regulation of pet ownership behaviours are dictated by animal welfare issues rather than ecological impacts.

Projects to manage free-ranging cats, such as Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) colonies, are potentially harmful to wildlife populations, but are implemented across the United States without widespread public knowledge, consideration of scientific evidence, or the environmental review processes typically required for actions with harmful environmental consequences.”

Change your cat’s bell to save birds: here.

April 2013. A study by British scientists has documented for the first time significant new impacts to birds from outdoor cats, reporting that even brief appearances of cats near avian nest sites leads to at least a doubling in lethal nest predation of eggs and young birds by third-party animals, as well as behavioural changes in parent birds that lead to an approximately 33 percent reduction in the amount of food brought to nestlings following a predation threat: here.

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9 thoughts on “United States cats kill billions of birds

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  2. Please, keep cats indoors during spring time. You can put on cat bells, and it does work normally, except during spring time!
    Lot of bird chicks that leave their nest and stay on the ground for a few days are simply too vulnerable. They can’t fly yet. By noticing their parents flying away, and notice their parents jumping onto branches (after feeding), they learn to copy that behaviour by jump on to branches too. From there on the juvenile bird learns to hop from branch to branch and eventually it learns to fly.
    So, you have a nestling, after that a fledgling, and after that a flying bird. During the time bird chicks are fed on the ground by their parents, they have no clue about cat-bells and even if they had, they wouldn’t be able to get from the ground in time.
    It is therefore paramount cats are kept indoors when a nestling spends some days on the ground. It will only take a few days for them to get their pilots diploma. They need our help because we have too many cats (apart from cars, cats have no natural enemies in our cities). I think we owe young birds our help too. Who doesn’t smile when we hear them singing in the early morning?

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