Save California condors


This video from the USA is called Wild California Condors Made Here.

From Wildlife Extra:

New National Park declared in California to protect condors

New Law Elevates Pinnacles National Monument to Become 9th National Park in California

January 2013. President Obama has signed the paperwork that creates USA’s 59th National Park as Pinnacles National Monument become Pinnacles National Park.

“This ancient and awe-inspiring volcanic field with its massive monoliths, spires, cave passages and canyons is a place that restores our souls and energizes our bodies with its beauty and abundant opportunities for outdoor recreation,” Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar said. “I commend Rep. Sam Farr and Sen. Barbara Boxer for their vision in sponsoring the legislation to make it a national park.”

400 species of bee

Rising out of the Gabilan Mountains east of central California’s Salinas Valley, Pinnacles is the result of millions of years of erosion, faulting and tectonic plate movement. Within the park’s boundaries lie nearly 27,000 acres of diverse wild lands. Visitors delight in the beauty and variety of its spring wildflowers and more than 400 species of native bees. The Pinnacles rock formations are a popular destination to challenge technical and beginner climbers alike.

Designated as a national monument in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt, the park’s management will not change by the legislation. The Pinnacles National Park Act recognizes the broader significance of park resources, specifically the chaparral, grasslands, blue oak woodlands, and majestic valley oak savanna ecosystems of the area, the area’s geomorphology, riparian watersheds, unique flora and fauna, and the ancestral and cultural history of native Americans, settlers and explorers.

Californian condors

Pinnacles National Park is also well known as an incubator of America’s fragile population of California Condors. It is one of three condor release sites in the country, and the only release site in a national park. Pinnacles has been a partner of the California Condor Recovery Program since 2003. The park manages 31 free-flying condors. Each bird is monitored after its release to increase its chances of survival. Park biologists and volunteers monitor chicks hatched in the wild. They check blood and feather samples for signs of poisoning from ingestion of lead-contaminated food. They also monitor condors to aid research about their habitat and movement.

“The National Parks Conservation Association commented “The park’s sanctuary for the California Condor and native wildlife, its red crags, caves, impressive displays of spring wildflowers, and opportunities for star viewing under its noteworthy dark skies make Pinnacles a special place and worthy of its national park status for future generations to enjoy. But the work isn’t done. For years, an adjacent landowner has urged Congress to allow his 18,200 acre, geologically significant property to be included in Pinnacles, but Congress has yet to act on this landowner’s proposal. In the spirit of protecting and enhancing Pinnacles National Park, the National Parks Conservation Association will continue to support efforts to expand the park’s boundaries, when it becomes feasible to do so.”

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6 thoughts on “Save California condors

  1. Pingback: Peruvian condors in trouble | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: California condors threatened by lead poisoning | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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