10 thoughts on “Big European anti-austerity strikes

  1. Tragic cost of crisis for Ireland’s emigrants

    On 1 November the crisis in Ireland and Europe took on a clear face and a tragic story for me. Declan Gilmartin, 22, from Leitrim hanged himself in north London.

    Like many young people from Ireland, economic conditions drove him to seek work abroad, far from his family and friends. He moved out of necessity rather than choice and in the process became alienated and lonely.

    Ireland is losing a generation. Some 182,900 15 to 29 year olds have left since the crisis began. Many then face real social problems without the support networks they grew up with.

    Capitalism seeks to alienate and divide us, and we strive to offer a socialist alternative. But the only option Declan felt he had was to take his own life.

    Ruairi O’Neill, Bristol

    http://socialistworker.co.uk/art.php?id=29976

    • Who wrote this? I am Declan Gilmartins sister, do not write stuff like this without knowing the facts. Declan was a well respected and well known young man in a very close knit Irish community in Cricklewood and played football for the Garyowen football club, the reception our family recieved from the Irish community there reflects this, do more research. Educate yourself before writing. Karen Gilmartin Msc

      • Hello Karen, as the signature says, and the link underneath it, this is a leter by Ruairi O’Neill in Bristol. I only blogged it. I think you should contact Ruairi O’Neil and Socialist Worker weekly to discuss this. All my best wishes for you and your family.

        • Thank you very much for your wishes, I have contacted The Socialist Worker weekly regarding the misleading article of “Tragic cost of crisis for Ireland’s emigrants”. Lack of research was conducted by Mr Ruairi O’Neill, Bristol. I know you only blogged this article but unfortunately this man used a misleading Irish emigrant suicide stereotype and labeled my brother by using him as an example to support the main theme of his article which was non-applicable to our situation.
          Best wishes,
          Karen Gilmartin Msc

          • Thank you Ms Gilmartin, for this comment!

            I blogged Mr Ruairi O’Neill’s letter to the editor as I thought it was an example of the economic crisis’ impact on people’s lives. I hope you can further solve this issue with the Socialist Worker editors.

            • Don’t turn Declan into a stereotype

              I am writing to correct Mr Ruairi O’Neill (Letters, 17 November). He states that “on 1 November the crisis in Ireland and Europe took on a clear face and a tragic story for me. Declan Gilmartin, 22, from Leitrum hanged himself in north London”.

              The fact is Declan Gilmartin died on 2 November and Leitrim is the correct spelling of this county in Ireland.

              Mr O’Neill is correct when he says “Like many young people from Ireland, economic conditions drove him to seek work abroad. He moved out of necessity rather than choice.”

              However, the process did not make Declan “alienated and lonely”. He had family and friends in London before he arrived and he made numerous friends during his three years in Cricklewood.

              He was a well respected and a well known young man in a very close knit Irish community. Declan played football for the GAA Garryowen football club.

              The outstanding reception the Gilmartin family received from the Irish community reflects that this young man was by no means alienated and lonely. Over a hundred people gathered in St Agnes church in Cricklewood on Friday 9 November to offer their condolences and pay their respects to the family. Many of these people followed Declan to Ireland to bring him to his final resting place and attend his removal and funeral.

              On the other hand, Mr O’Neill is correct when he describes how “Ireland is losing a generation. Some 182,900 15 to 29 year olds have left since the crisis began. Many then face real social problems without the support networks they grew up with.”

              This is non-applicable to Declan Gilmartin, there is a Leitrim association in London. In Ireland, the GAA is the heart of every community and this is truly the case with the Garryowen football club.

              London has numerous support networks for Irish emigrants, after all, the truth of the matter is, London is and traditionally always has been a very popular destination for Irish emigrants in this economic crisis and previous economic crises throughout Irish history.

              Mr O’Neill emphasises that “Capitalism seeks to alienate and divide us, and we strive to offer a socialist alternative. But the only option Declan felt he had was to take his own life”.

              Declan Gilmartin’s death was suicide by misadventure; it was not pre-planned or pre-meditated. This shows little respect for the Gilmartin family and his many friends, no consideration was given. Mr O’Neill makes an uneducated hypothesis and uses the tragic death of a young man as a case study which does not support the main theme of his letter.

              I know the facts and I am educated to talk about this issue because I am Declan Gilmartin’s sister and our family have much appreciated respect and gratitude for the Irish support networks in London.

              It is obvious Mr O’Neill did no previous research before writing. The grammar used was notorious. One can only wonder what University this so called writer Mr O’Neill attended.

              Educate yourself before writing. In the words of Saint Augustine of Hippo: “The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.”

              Karen Gilmartin, County Leitrim, Ireland

              http://www.socialistworker.co.uk/art.php?id=30094

  2. Pingback: Record visitors numbers to this blog in November. | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Spanish banks make people homeless | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s