Dutch Rottum islands new animal book


This video, from August 2011, is about hundreds of black-headed gulls, trying to catch winged ants on their bridal flights on Rottumeroog island.

North of the Netherlands are three desert islands: Rottumeroog, Rottumerplaat, and Zuiderduin. (Zuiderduin: see also here).

On Tuesday 6 November, a new book will be published on the animals of the Rottum archipelago. Its authors are the wildlife ranger Nico de Vries and Mark Zekhuis. Its name is Fauna van Rottum.

There is much in the book about the birds of the islands. But not only about birds.

Bert Corté, wildlife ranger of Rottum, writes on his blog:

Fauna of Rottum has a systematic overview of all animal species ever recorded on the Rottum archipelago. Eg, jellyfish, molluscs, crustaceans, centipedes. Mammals, dragonflies and butterflies are discussed extensively as well.

Roe deer on Rottum: here.

Rottum Canada geese: here.

Rottumerplaat in March 2013: here.

Rottumerplaat birds in April 2013: here. In June 2013: here.

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