Amphibian discoveries song


About this song from the USA:

The total number of amphibian species reached 7,000 today [Monday 7/31/12]. The 7000th known amphibian is a new glassfrog from Peru, Centrolene sabini (Catenazzi et al 2012), which was discovered at high elevations in Manu National Park, Peru. Glassfrogs have increased from 65 in 1985 to 152 known today, illustrating the paradoxical phenomenon of amphibian discovery during a time of great concern for amphibians.

In June 2012, IUCN reported 41% of amphibian species at risk of extinction. Yet, the number of known amphibian species has increased dramatically, from 4,013 in 1985 to 7,000. Enjoy AmphibiaWeb’s new song in celebration of the 7000th species! (from amphibiaweb.org)

You can read more about the song in The Atlantic here: www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/07/the-awesomeness-of-singing-about-frogs-toads-and-newts/260516/#tw

Listen to the song and the story behind it on NPR’s All Things Considered:
www.npr.org/2012/08/02/157880479/discovery-of-7-000th-amphibian-celebrated-in-song

Download the song here:
thewigglytendrils.bandcamp.com/track/7000-kinds-of-amphibians-a7k

You can learn more about amphibians at Amphibiaweb:
www.amphibiaweb.org

I wrote this song for amphibiaweb.org by request. I’d be happy to write you a song about anything that you could possibly imagine.

Just visit my website to get started:

thewigglytendrils.com/request-song/

It’s in the key of D major. Here’s how I’m voicing the chords on the Ukulele:

D 2225
D7 2223
A 2434
F# 4232
Bm 4222

Lyrics:

From the slimiest frog (D)
to the tiniest toad (D)
to their larva which go (D)
by the name “tadpoles” (D)
to the (A7) caecilians
that wiggle in their holes
to the giant (D) salamander
that grows and grows (D7)
most lay eggs (F#)
their blood runs cold
but they’re (Bm) not lizard
(F#) no no no!

they’re (D) amphibians
amphibians
7000 kinds of amphibians
stomp (F#) your feet
clap your hands
7000 (D) kinds of amphibians

(D) Pipa pipa
hatches larva in its back
Rhinoderma rufum
holds them in it’s vocal sac
(A7) Eurycea sosorum
external gills on it’s head
Dyscophus (D) antongilii
is tomato like and red
most lay eggs (F#)
their blood runs cold
but they’re (Bm) not lizard
(F#) no no no!

they’re (D) amphibians
amphibians
7000 kinds of amphibians
stomp (F#) your feet
clap your hands
7000 (D) kinds of amphibians

(D) Atretochoana eiselti
doesn’t have any lungs
Rhinophrynus dorsalis
has a funny tongue
(A7) Anodonthyla montana
always ready for a climb
Plethodon (D) glutinosus
is synonymous with slime
most lay eggs (F#)
their blood runs cold
but they’re (Bm) not lizard
(F#) no no no!

they’re (D) amphibians
amphibians
7000 kinds of amphibians
stomp (F#) your feet
clap your hands
7000 (D) kinds of amphibians

they’re amphibians
amphibians
7000 kinds of amphibians
detach your tail
secrete your glands
7000 kinds of amphibians

Hundreds of Scientists Support Endangered Species Act Petition for Rarest U.S. Frogs, Turtles, Toads, Snakes, Lizards and Salamanders: here.

ScienceDaily (Sep. 10, 2012) — All tadpoles grow into frogs, but not all frogs start out as tadpoles, reveals a new study on 720 species of frogs to be published in the journal Evolution: here.

Southern Darwin's frog

It looks like we’ve lost another one. The weird and unusual Chile Darwin’s frog (Rhinoderma rufum), whose tadpoles grew inside the vocal sacs of adult males, appears to be extinct: a four-year quest failed to turn up any evidence that the species still exists. The frogs were last seen in 1980: here.

4 thoughts on “Amphibian discoveries song

  1. Pingback: Poem on fossil amphibian | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: How animals learned to eat plants | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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