Lion discovery in Ethiopian forests


This video is called Lives of Lions.

From Wildlife Extra:

Lions spotted in Ethiopia’s mountain forests

Africa[n] lions documented in montane rain forest for the very first time

September 2012. The first evidence of lions in montane rain and cloud forest has been documented by NABU – The German Nature and Biodiversity Conservation Union. Up to now, the African lion, which is classified as vulnerable by the IUCN had only been documented and photographed outside of rainforests.

Ethiopia

The discovery in the Kafa Biosphere Reserve in Southwest Ethiopia took place as part of NABU’s wider conservation work in Ethiopia. NABU’s images show a lioness in an area of dense montane rain and cloud forests.

“We are delighted with this news and look forward to studying these exceptional animals in their unusual habitat,” says NABU’s Vice-President Thomas Tennhardt. “To manage potential conflict with local communities, NABU will set up a dedicated conservation fund.”

Lions prefer open woodlands, and thick bush, scrub and grass land areas, which offer sufficient cover for hunting. Until now, scientists have never recorded the species in rain forest habitats. However, local people have long known about the lions in the Kafa Biosphere Reserve.

Wildlife photographer Bruno D’Amicis travelled to Ethiopia on NABU’s behalf in early 2012 in an attempt to document their presence. NABU believes that this is the first time lions have ever been photographed in montane rain and cloud forest habitat.

Cloud forests

Ethiopia’s Kafa Biosphere Reserve is characterised by its impressive afromontane moist rain and cloud forests, which are considered to be the place of origin of Arabica coffee. Apart from wild coffee, it is also home to many rare animal and plant species. Southern Ethiopia is regarded as an important migratory route for lions; it is therefore assumed that the animals are passing through the area during the dry season.

85% [of] Africa’s lions have disappeared

African lions have lost more than 85 percent of their historic range. Recent surveys indicate that across the continent there are now just 39,000 lions left, of which up to 1,500 live in Ethiopia. Both their numbers and range have declined significantly in recent decades in Africa. Habitat loss and fragmentation due to human population growth and the reduction of prey animals, direct persecution and hunting are the primary reasons for their demise.

In line with the Regional Conservation Strategy for the Lion in Eastern and Southern Africa, the Ethiopia Wildlife Conservation Authority recently adopted a National Action Plan for lions in Ethiopia to secure and restore lion populations in the country.

NABU is Germany´s oldest and largest conservation organization.

DNA Confirms Distinct Genetically Different Lions For Ethiopia: here.

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6 thoughts on “Lion discovery in Ethiopian forests

  1. Pingback: Good Iranian cheetah news | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Ethiopian girl reportedly guarded by lions

    Authorities: Cats chased off men trying to force her to marry

    6/21/2005 6:25:07 PM ET

    ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — A 12-year-old girl who was abducted and beaten by men trying to force her into a marriage was found being guarded by three lions who apparently had chased off her captors, a policeman said Tuesday.

    The girl, missing for a week, had been taken by seven men who wanted to force her to marry one of them, said Sgt. Wondimu Wedajo, speaking by telephone from the provincial capital of Bita Genet, about 350 miles southwest of Addis Ababa.

    She was beaten repeatedly before she was found June 9 by police and relatives on the outskirts of Bita Genet, Wondimu said. She had been guarded by the lions for about half a day, he said.

    “They stood guard until we found her and then they just left her like a gift and went back into the forest,” Wondimu said.

    “If the lions had not come to her rescue, then it could have been much worse. Often these young girls are raped and severely beaten to force them to accept the marriage,” he said.

    ‘Some kind of miracle’

    Tilahun Kassa, a local government official who corroborated Wondimu’s version of the events, said one of the men had wanted to marry the girl against her wishes.

    “Everyone thinks this is some kind of miracle, because normally the lions would attack people,” Wondimu said.

    Stuart Williams, a wildlife expert with the rural development ministry, said the girl may have survived because she was crying from the trauma of her attack.

    “A young girl whimpering could be mistaken for the mewing sound from a lion cub, which in turn could explain why they didn’t eat her,” Williams said.

    Ethiopia’s lions, famous for their large black manes, are the country’s national symbol and adorn statues and the local currency. Despite a recent crackdown, hunters kill the animals for their skins, which can fetch $1,000. Williams estimates that only 1,000 Ethiopian lions remain in the wild.

    The girl, the youngest of four siblings, was “shocked and terrified” after her abduction and had to be treated for the cuts from her beatings, Wondimu said.

    He said police had caught four of the abductors and three were still at large.

    Kidnapping young girls has long been part of the marriage custom in Ethiopia. The United Nations estimates that more than 70 percent of marriages in Ethiopia are by abduction, practiced in rural areas where most of the country’s 71 million people live.

    © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

  3. Pingback: New lion species discovery in Ethiopian zoo? | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. really ! it was true and was very amazing event. now such harmful traditional practices are being reduced b/c of continuous awareness creation programs by gov and NGOs

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