Baby shelducks, cygnets and hare


Yesterday, again to the “Baillon’s crakes’ reserve”.

Near the southern entrance, a reed warbler sings.

A female tufted duck swims.

A reed bunting song.

In the southern lake: shoveler ducks. Egyptian geese. A Canada goose nesting. An oystercatcher. A northern lapwing drives away a magpie.

A little ringed plover.

A common tern. Two black-tailed godwits wading.

A spoonbill lands in the northern lake.

Redshank and greenfinch sounds.

Four swifts fly past.

The water lilies have started flowering.

Domestic duck resting, 27 May 2012

A domestic duck escapee resting on the dike near the north-south bridge.

Mute swan with cygnets, 27 May 2012

A mute swan swimming in the north-south canal, with six cygnets.

Redshanks on northern lake mudflats.

Two barnacle geese. A black swan swimming.

Shelduck with ducklings, 27 May 2012

Near the railway, two adult shelducks. Like the last time when I was here, with seven ducklings. They swim past a grey heron on the bank. So, not one little one caught since last time (by a cat, a pike, or a grey heron).

Shelduck swimming with ducklings, 27 May 2012

A sedge warbler sings behind the shelduck family, in the reedbeds.

Sedge warbler singing, 27 May 2012

Great crested grebes and coots swim here with youngsters as well.

Coot, with chick, 27 May 2012

A hare in the same spot as last time, probably the same individual.

Hare, 27 May 2012

A group of five ring-necked parakeets flies overhead, calling.

Two goldfinches singing in a treetop.

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7 thoughts on “Baby shelducks, cygnets and hare

  1. Hi Stephen, swans have in common with eg, some dinosaur species (dinosaurs are ancestral to birds) that young animals are really small and have to grow much to reach adulthood. Comparatively the biggest bird eggs (where maybe young birds have to grow the least) are kiwis’.

  2. Pingback: African bird count update | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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