European turtle doves and African sea-eagle


9 February 2012.

After the morning, in the afternoon by boat on the Gambia river, along the northern bank.

A blue-breasted kingfisher.

A Senegal coucal.

A fork-tailed drongo.

The fork-tailed drongo bird of Africa—quite the trickster—imitates multiple species’ warning calls to scare off other animals and steal their food, a study published Thursday revealed. Read more here.

Black crakes, Gambia river, 9 February 2012

Two black crakes on the muddy river bank.

A pied kingfisher on a tree along the river.

Pied kingfisher, Gambia river, 9 February 2012

Another pied kingfisher and a broad-billed roller, sharing a dead tree.

Broad-billed roller, Gambia river, 9 February 2012

An African mourning dove on a branch near the water.

A bit further are its migratory relatives: scores of European turtle doves on a tall tree, spending the winter here.

European turtle doves, Gambia river, 9 February 2012

Another tree with many European turtle doves, with a hamerkop at its feet.

Again, a broad-billed roller.

Black-headed weavers.

Finally, on the bank, a beautiful African sea-eagle.

African sea-eagle, Gambia river, 9 February 2012

This is a BBC African sea-eagle (or fish-eagle) video.

See also this photo.

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13 thoughts on “European turtle doves and African sea-eagle

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