Gibbon conservation in Laos


This video is on wildlife in Laos.

From Fauna & Flora International:

National Gibbon Conservation Action Plan launched in Lao People’s Democratic Republic

18th July 2011

Lao PDR further commits to protecting globally important biodiversity by launching a national action plan

Fauna & Flora International (FFI) and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) have been coordinating preparation of a national action plan with the Division of Forest Resource Conservation within the Department of Forestry for the conservation of gibbons in Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR).

Paul Insua-Cao, FFI’s China – Indochina Primate Programme Manager said, “Native to the forests of Southeast Asia, gibbons are considered to be among nature’s greatest acrobats. Throughout their range gibbons are under considerable threat, often restricted to isolated patches of forest within a region with some of the highest human population densities in the world.”

Altogether six species of gibbon are known from Lao PDR, among 18 species globally. Of particular conservation significance are crested gibbons, of which there are four species in Lao PDR. This is the most endangered genus of gibbons and they are found almost exclusively east of the Mekong River, also in Cambodia, China and Vietnam.

Fate of Vietnam’s Gibbons Hangs in the Balance: here.

Gibbons effortlessly use the same techniques as professional opera singers when calling out to other animals, scientists found by listening to the squeaky songs of one of the apes on helium: here.

About these ads

4 thoughts on “Gibbon conservation in Laos

  1. Pingback: Hillary Clinton in still bomb-sick Laos | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Pingback: Monkeys in danger in Peru | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Two Indian tiger cubs rescued | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: Myanmar hoolock gibbons, new research | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s