Anti-government demonstration in Yemen


This video says about itself:

Revolution of South Yemen. Demonstration of the Southerners in the UK. London 30/05/2009

After a fast union in 1990, the dictator Ali Abdullah Saleh (President of North Yemen) launched, in 27 of april 1994, a comprehensive war on South Yemen, using land, marine and air forces as well as rockets and tribal militias. The regime in Sana’a was determined to impose unity by force and war ignoring calls from countries over the world and Security Council decisions Nos. 924 and 931 calling for immediate stop of the war, and rejecting imposed unity, and in spite of the fact that the US considered Aden as a Red Line. Ever since, the South has been under the North occupation.

Since the 1994 war, the people of the South have used all peaceful means to restore their state.

On 7 July, 2007, the thirteenth anniversary of the occupation of the South, the peaceful South revolution started to gain more popular support through the civil organizations of the South. Peaceful popular demonstrations started to take place in all cities and town of the South, calling for self-determination and restoration of the state of the South as it was prior to 1990.

The military regime in Sana’a replied by using force and live ammunition to encounter these peaceful demonstrations and strikes: the heavily armed military forces is deploying in all towns and cities of the South; hundreds of people are arrested, and many are martyred and injured.
These peaceful demonstrations still resisting the military apparatus and asking the world for help !!

From Associated Press:

Thousands Demand Ouster Of Yemen‘s President

SANAA, Yemen January 22, 2011, 11:40 am ET

Thousands of Yemeni protesters have called for the ouster of their president after 32 years in power.

Students, activists and opposition groups gathered Saturday inside the University of Sanaa in the capital to chant slogans against President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

It appeared to be the first demonstration to directly confront the rule of Yemen’s president, something that had been a red line few dissenters dared to challenge.

The demonstrators clearly drew inspiration from the recent ouster of Tunisia’s longtime leader, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

“Oh, Ali, join your friend Ben Ali,” the crowds chanted.

Police fired tear gas at the demonstrators, whose grievances include proposed constitutional changes that would allow the president to rule for a lifetime.

Protesters Say Ruling Party in Tunisia Must Dissolve: here.