German government lies on Kunduz massacre, Afghanistan


This is a a Canadian video, commenting on the Kunduz massacre.

New details about the massacre in Kunduz, Afghanistan, at the beginning of September last year, which costs the lives of 142 people, disprove the statements and declarations made by the German government: here.

Germany’s foreign minister, Guido Westerwelle, backed the idea of a permanent European army Saturday. While speaking to the Munich Security Conference, Westerwelle said a parliamentary run army would help the EU in its role as a “global player”: here.

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14 thoughts on “German government lies on Kunduz massacre, Afghanistan

  1. Reports: Afghan forces kill seven Pakistani tribesmen
    05.02.2010 14:07

    Reports: Afghan forces kill seven Pakistani tribesmen

    Afghan troops allegedly shot dead at least seven Pakistani tribesmen overnight near the ill-defined border between the two countries, media reports said Friday.

    Those killed were described as members of the Shamsozai tribe from the Spina Teezha area, located about 50 kilometres from the western Pakistani town of Chaman, DPA reported.

    The men had gone into the Afghan border region Thursday to collect firewood and were returning when a group of Afghan soldiers intercepted them, the Geo News television channel said, citing tribal chief Haji Naimat Khan.

    Khan accused local Afghan military officer Mohammad Aiwaz of killing the seven Pakistanis, supposedly over a long-running tribal feud.

    The news channel Aaj reported that Afghan military commander Abdul Razzaq had ordered his forces to arrest Aiwaz.

    Shamsozai tribesmen brought the bodies back to Pakistan after staging a protest in the Afghan town of Spin Boldak.

    Ethnic Pashtun tribes straddling the poorly marked Afghan border frequently travel across it to visit relatives and for trade.

    http://en.trend.az/regions/world/afghanistan/1633612.html

  2. Thousands of Afghan election staff banned from poll duties

    By THE CANADIAN PRESS

    Last Updated: 4th February 2010, 8:49am

    KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — Afghanistan’s Independent Election Commission said Thursday thousands of election staff will be banned from working for this year’s parliamentary polls.

    A spokesman for the electoral body said the ban stemmed from an internal investigation into last year’s flawed presidential election, which saw Hamid Karzai returned to power amid allegations of fraud.

    Noor Mohammad Noor told The Canadian Press that 6,000 of the 165,000 contract staff who worked for the presidential election will not be allowed on future votes.

    “We have identified about 6,000 who didn’t work in a proper way according to our procedure,” Noor said. “They won’t be allowed to (return to) their jobs.”

    The ban applies only to contract staff who were hired to work at polling stations, he said.

    Authorities threw out more than a million ballots in August’s presidential election, which was marred by widespread vote rigging, low voter turnout and a general lack of security.

    A second vote was called, but Karzai was declared the winner after his main rival, former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah, dropped out over concerns about the fairness of the election.

    Thursday’s move comes after the election commission announced last month it would push back a parliamentary vote scheduled to Sept. 18 from May 22.

    Election officials say the delay is needed to give the government time to learn from and fix the mistakes that plagued the presidential vote.

    The commission has also said moving back the election date gives the government more time to raise the cash needed to pay for the vote.

    Money has been slow to trickle in from donor countries wary of a repeat of last year’s problems.

    Fazil Manawi, a senior commissioner, told reporters last month the commission needs about $50 million from the international community to pay for the parliamentary election, which is budgeted to cost $120 million.

    Manawi also cited logistical challenges and security concerns as obstacles to a spring vote.

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