First jaguar photo from Panamanian island


From the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama:

First jaguar photo taken at Smithsonian Research Station in Panama

May 4th, 2009

Barro Colorado Island in Panama, home of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute’s premier tropical biology field station, has been described as the best-studied piece of tropical real estate in the western hemisphere. Although the island has been a mecca for biologists for nearly 90 years, no one has ever photographed an elusive island visitor, the jaguar—until now.

Montclair State University zoologist Jackie Willis and her husband Greg mount cameras with infrared sensors on trees to photograph passing animals as part of their annual mammal census of the island, which they have been conducting since 1982. What the cameras captured April 20 was not only a surprise, but a first—an adult jaguar tripped the camera’s sensor at 3:07 a.m., thus creating a self-portrait photograph.

“Our photo of a jaguar on Barro Colorado is a sign of hope,” said Jackie Willis. “It proves jaguars are still in this area.” Greg Willis spotted a jaguar on the island in 1983, but there have been very few sightings on Barro Colorado since.

Living With Jaguars: Getting Up Close With Animals at Bolivia’s Ambue Ari Reserve: here.

Burbot extinct in British rivers, not in London zoo


From London zoo in England:

Extinct in UK rivers, the burbot fish now swims at ZSL London Zoo

A fish which disappeared from UK waters over 30 years ago has been cast a lifeline by ZSL.

Four burbot fish are now being displayed in one of the Aquarium’s freshwater tanks, giving members of the public their first ever glance at the mysterious species which originate from the streams and lakes of North America and Europe.

The fish, which hasn’t been seen or caught in UK waters since the 1970s, is the only freshwater member of the cod family and joins over 200 different species in our own collection.

Mallow skipper butterfly back in the Netherlands


Mallow skipper

From the Dutch butterfly foundation:

Near Maastricht, the mallow skipper butterfly has been observed, a species which had been seen in the Netherlands for the last time in 1953. This species is helped by warming …

See also here.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to protect the Dakota skipper and the Poweshiek skipperling: here.

Global warming driving Michigan mammals north: here.