Plants etc. in the botanical gardens


Bilimbi fruitsFrom the Google cache of Dear Kitty ModBlog:

Date: 9/12/05 at 9:19AM

Mood: Looking Playing: Smoke on the waters, by Deep Purple

In the hothouses of the botanical gardens today.

Some plants from tropical rainforests need lots of water. Including the bilimbi.

Especially when it has lots of leaves. It needs less water if it has just been pruned.

Also the tropical almond needs much water.
Blue water lily

In the Victoria amazonica hothouse is also a smaller member of the water lily family: the blue water lily.

It played a big role as a symbol in ancient Egyptian history.

In the brook, the pondskaters are still there.

However, the tadpoles of spring are not there anymore. They have been eaten; or have become frogs or toads.

Flowers outside attract many insects, including honey bees and two bumblebee species on the same plant.

Snow lotus in China: here.

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5 thoughts on “Plants etc. in the botanical gardens

  1. Also from Dear Kitty ModBlog Google cache:

    Retired Mechanic Finds New Flower Species

    By Associated Press

    June 16, 2005

    BAUXITE, Ark. — Hiking in the Ouachita Mountains one day, retired mechanic John Pelton’s eye caught a pink flower that he hadn’t noticed before. The man with a passion for plant life couldn’t figure out just what kind of flower he had found in Saline County.

    He contacted Theo Witsell, a botanist with the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, who couldn’t find the plant in any books or on any Web sites.

    Witsell spent years classifying the plant and will officially unveil it as a new species found only in two rare Saline County habitats in an article to be published next month in the botany journal Sida, Contributions to Botany.

    The small, pink flower is named Pelton’s rose-gentian.

    “It’s bloomed in Arkansas beside all the known species for years,” Witsell said. “It’s not every day that you find a new plant species in a temperate climate like North America.”

    The plant is rare because it’s habitat is rare, Witsell said.

  2. Pingback: Liebster Award, thanks Morrighan! | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: Thanks for tagging this blog, Carolyn! | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  4. Pingback: History of plants and labour in the botanical garden | Dear Kitty. Some blog

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